argue

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Related to argues: Argos
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Synonyms for argue

quarrel

Synonyms

discuss

argue someone into something

Synonyms

  • persuade someone to
  • convince someone to
  • talk someone into
  • prevail upon someone to
  • talk someone round to

Synonyms for argue

to put forth reasons for or against something, often excitedly

to put into words positively and with conviction

to give grounds for believing in the existence or presence of

argue into: to succeed in causing (a person) to act in a certain way

Synonyms for argue

References in classic literature ?
Nor are the reasonings of Schleiermacher, who argues that the Platonic defence is an exact or nearly exact reproduction of the words of Socrates, partly because Plato would not have been guilty of the impiety of altering them, and also because many points of the defence might have been improved and strengthened, at all more conclusive.
Yet, if they did it wrong," I said, "you couldn't argue the question.
But in his most recent book, The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries That Defined America, Jeffrey Rosen argues for another possibility: temperament.
It also is a hugely persuasive tract that argues that global economic integration can result in a positive outcome for the planet.
Kinney argues that prior to the Han dynasty, there was little mention of children, but during the Han dynasty childhood suddenly became an intellectual focus.
Authority for disclosing information about other taxpayers' transactions, the Service argues, can be found in Sec.
Mittelstadt argues that social reformers, concerned about the post-war "paradox of prosperity", were designing--and passing--policies aimed at those mired in "fundamental poverty".
That pattern argues that ancestors of the desert locust crossed the Atlantic to give rise to a lineage that branched out in the New World, he says.
The 19th-century robber barons--businessmen often described as having grown fabulously rich through deceit, fraud and exploitation of workers--were in reality, he argues, men who improved the lives of millions of Americans by offering them new and innovative products, ones that made life better and did so cheaply.
In chapter one, Daniel Aiken argues for the single-elder-led-church model.
Neurobiology, he argues, has amassed an impressive array of detail but lacks a compelling framework for understanding intelligence and brain function.
The DOD argues that even the threat of interference by hazardous waste litigation justifies its aims.
Harink is a theologian who argues passionately in this book that Paul's theology, as interpreted by recent scholarship, fits well with certain postliberal theologians, especially Karl Barth, John Howard Yoder, and Stanley Hauerwas.
She argues that women, although severely marginalized, exercised purposeful strategies to gain access to publishing, taking advantage of the new opportunities offered by print.
Kate O'Connell of the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society also argues, "There's enough doubt about how big whale populations really are to have us worried.