apprehensible


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Synonyms for apprehensible

capable of being apprehended or understood

References in periodicals archive ?
and are based in thought (Jn 1:3; Col 1:15), they are also apprehensible and conceivable by the human mind" (Reformed Dogmatics 1:231--32).
While the physical and conceptual qualities of the element of earth are transmitted in A Pair of Peasant Shoes, the very principle or idea of motion itself (which is essentially only apprehensible) has become physical and sensible in The Starry Night.
In a letter to EBB, Powers, a practicing spiritualist and reader of Swedenborg, explains his theory of art, contending that "art should be, in aim, spiritual and animal--the nude statue should be an unveiled soul" in which "transience and permanence should be in perfect equipoise: the two worlds visible and apprehensible at the same moment." (26) While "transience" and ephemerality are not characteristics one would typically apply to marble statues, Powers's understanding of sculpture as simultaneously material and immaterial makes it a particularly appropriate subject for poetry, a sister art that is similarly abstract and concrete.
The next most readily apprehensible element is the clearly lit arched doorway, and then right away a white-uniformed nurse comes through the door, so we have both lighting, color (white) and movement to draw our attention.
Second, it is a way of experiencing that is directly apprehensible without need for inferences.
Ropke points out that ideologies often utilize the language of values such as "common interest," "justice," and "patriotism." Yet this does not mean, he argues, that common interest, justice, and patriotism are "ideologies themselves." For these are values, he states, to the extent they are apprehensible as good by all people regardless of their particular conditions.
"That an invented thing is 'real' will be ascertainable by the immediately apprehensible material fact of itself," Elain Scarry states, arguing that a tree "has a materialized existence that is confirmable by vision, touch, hearing, smell; its reality is accessible to all the senses; its existence is thus confirmed within the bodies of the observers themselves." (12) This article will explore how representations of the body in Nymph()maniac and Sula, particularly regarding the sensory experiences of their protagonists, correspond, confront, and disrupt discursive power structures.
Most recently, in the novel Mo said she was quirky Kelman achieves the greatest possible distance from the centre of hegemonic masculinity with a female central character, Helen, where significant males have no directly apprehensible existence, only as reported by her.
While this is not the place to offer anything like an adequate account of the social transformations that underpinned 'command under instability' as a structure and stance, it is helpful to make it more apprehensible by citing some of its characteristic moments.
The temporal and spatial disjunctions of the sensorily apprehensible lettered city that Carpentier constructs permeate the everyday.
Poe's chambers of dreams either approximate the circle--which Poe regarded as "the emblem of Eternity"--or they so lack any apprehensible regularity of shape as to suggest the changeableness and spatial freedom of the dreaming mind (Wilbur 1967: 112-113).
Strategic planning ideal environment is stable, moderate and apprehensible, while today real environment does not have any of these features [13].
Therefore to compress the scope of this review paper into a more understandable and apprehensible reference for further research this paper will concentrate on the partly intervalcensored data since existing studies pay less attention on this area of interest.
Durkheim's sociological premise is that societies are moral orders, apprehensible scientifically as "social facts," which are "any way of acting, whether fixed or not, capable of exerting over the individual an external constraint" (Durkheim 1982: 59).