appraise

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Related to appraisable: plausible, appreciable, applaudable
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Synonyms for appraise

Synonyms for appraise

to make a judgment as to the worth or value of

Synonyms for appraise

evaluate or estimate the nature, quality, ability, extent, or significance of

consider in a comprehensive way

References in periodicals archive ?
Gilbert's rejection of this kind of a prioristic approach which privileges rational persuasion and defines argument in terms of that single goal depends, therefore, on the existence of a class of linguistically inexplicable yet appraisable (against some criterial goal) argumentative moves that occur in the non-logical modes.
It may be the rhetorical effect rather than the rational strength of an argument that explains why an audience changes their minds, but this is a causal explanation and the rhetorical effects are not reasons in the required sense, and are not the proper subject of appraisal simply because causal relations in themselves are not appraisable.
Furthermore, according to the General Part of the Civil Code Act of 2002 (15), Article 66, property is "a set of monetarily appraisable rights and obligations belonging to a person unless otherwise provided by law.
The Act defines the prize as the right of a player to acquire money or other benefits having a monetarily appraisable value.
Furthermore, the rhythm with which one reads the stanza alters its syntactical elements: with the absence of punctuation, 'Pig Cupid' can be read as the culmination of the previous lines ('the appraisable / Pig Cupid'), or it could be understood as the subject of the next verb, 'Rooting'.
A person lacking an "evaluative scheme" in this wide sense would be a pathological case, helplessly propelled by the relative strength of occurrent desires: though we might view her with alarm and repugnance, she would not in Haji's terms be morally appraisable.
Musical works, or their performances at least, are constituted by sequences of sounds and, since such sequences are aesthetically appraisable on the basis of features directly revealed by hearing, it follows that the temporal as well as the non-temporal complexity of things is relevant to their aesthetic appraisal.
Botting writes, "The task of a theory of analysis is (as it always was) to sort out the appraisable from the non-appraisable and to put the appraisable into a form where it can be appraised" (p.
On this basis, Leslie contemplates a productive agent or agency which, while not necessarily identifiable with God, is nevertheless a being whose creative action is thereby appraisable in the category of right/wrong.