antipathy


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Related to antipathy: Antipathic, antipathetic
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Synonyms for antipathy

Synonyms for antipathy

Synonyms for antipathy

a feeling of intense dislike

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the object of a feeling of intense aversion

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References in periodicals archive ?
Even so, the Chancellor's antipathy towards manufacturing does not mean it is regarded with conte mpt elsewhere in Government.
No one needs to be reminded of Richard Nixon's profound antipathy toward the press, or Ronald Reagan's, or George Bush's.
THERE'S been a natural antipathy from Manchester United fans towards a former Kop idol who's not only been signed but given the hallowed No.7 shirt, that belonged to Best, Robson, Cantona, Beckham and Ronaldo.
Malachi davis admits he would 'understand' any antipathy towards him from fellow athletes after he was included in the Olympic squad for Athens - despite gaining a British passport less than two weeks ago.
This antipathy to her own kin is now translated into a generalised gripe,and,once again, the dread word ``racist'' is dredged up.
It is a surprising one for Greenberg to have made so positively, given his antipathy to the literary in painting.
Fields' antipathy to tax authorities dated back to the days when he toured the world as a celebrated juggler.
The early emergence of racial antipathy and the construction of racial hierarchy--both inseparable from sex and sexuality-are never far from the surface in the stories told by Jennifer Spear about French Louisiana, Graham Hodges about German Lutherans in New York, Daniel Mandell about New England, and Richard Godbeer about the eighteenth-century Southern backcountry.
I don't say that from any ideological antipathy. I believe in unions.
"The GOP Senate leadership's antipathy toward gay and lesbian Americans apparently runs so deep that they were able to callously turn their backs on hate-crime victims and their families, even as statistics show that hate crimes are on the rise," said Elizabeth Birch, executive director of the Human Rights Campaign, a gay lobby.
antipathy, Luck looks deeper, straight into the heart of American political culture.
Throughout the nineteenth century and well into the twentieth century, Catholics were looked down on and often discriminated against in the United States for a complex of reasons: lingering antagonism going back to Europe's religious wars, Protestant antipathy toward "popery," a cultural heritage of English dislike for the Irish, prejudice against non-English-speaking immigrants from southern and eastern Europe, and perceptions that Catholics in the United States were somehow tied to objectionable policies and practices of the Vatican and the papal states.
The culture shock for some prisoners transferred to the relaxed and spotless Wolds jail proved so unsettling they asked to be relocated back to jails characterised by the more familiar ''mutual antipathy'' between staff and inmates.
In an essay on Auguste Perret, Jourdain was describing the antipathy the French architectural establishment felt towards cast iron.
Renee Levine Melammed's superb recounting and analysis of a Castilian mid-wife's encounters with the Inquisition, Robert Garfield's unearthing of the vanished (or perhaps merely diluted?) Jewish community of Sao Tome Island, and Jerome Friedman's learned and wide-ranging study of the "religious alternatives" available to New Christians (which were illusory, in light of the racial antisemitism that replaced religious and ethnic antipathy) are great reading.