anglerfish


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Synonyms for anglerfish

fishes having large mouths with a wormlike filament attached for luring prey

References in periodicals archive ?
Dimorphism, parasitism, and sex revisited: modes of reproduction among deep-sea ceratioid anglerfishes (Teleostei: Lophiiformes).
Ugly, with a big mouth and an appetite to match: The monkfish, known variously as the goosefish, frogfish, anglerfish or 'allmouth' is a large, benthic (bottom dwelling) fish found in and around the Atlantic.
The ceratioid anglerfishes of the family Himantolophidae are most frequently caught at depths of 200-800 m (Bertelsen and Krefft 1988), mainly in tropical and subtropical waters.
This study focuses on Black Anglerfish, a demersal fish distributed along the Mediterranean Sea, as well as the northeastern Atlantic from the British Isles to Senegal (Caruso, 1986).
There will be a 16% cut for horse mackerel (North Sea and Eastern Channel), 5% for anglerfish (West Scotland), 14% for sole in the Norwegian Sea and the North Sea and for sprat (-35%) in Skagerrak and Kattegat, but -1% in the North Sea and Norwegian Sea.
* Some deep-sea creatures, like the hairy anglerfish, don't only rely on light to find their food.
``It appeared their entries had been altered by overwriting so that what had originally read `ANF' for anglerfish now read `SHARK','' a Defra spokesman said.
One creature not smiling is the male anglerfish. Six times smaller than the female, it sits on its partner's head after mating and stays there for the rest of its life.
The bizarre mystery squid shares the bathypelagic with zone some of Earth's most alien creatures, including anglerfish, razorfish, and dragonfish.
Of the 123 plates in Goode and Bean (1895), there is but a single skeleton, that of an anglerfish (plate CXX).
In-situ observations of a deep-sea ceratioid anglerfish of the genus Oneirodes (Lophiiformes: Oneirodidae).
It also argues that certain quota cuts (sole and cod in the Irish Sea, hake and Norway lobsters in Iberian waters and anglerfish in the Bay of Biscay) are insufficient because they will not lead to a sustainable exploitation of resources.
Pancake batfish, a type of anglerfish, have flattened bodies, wiggling lures on their faces and elbowed fins for "walking" on the seafloor.