ancient

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Synonyms for ancient

Synonyms for ancient

belonging to, existing, or occurring in times long past

of, existing, or occurring in a distant period

long past

Synonyms for ancient

a very old person

a person who lived in ancient times

belonging to times long past especially of the historical period before the fall of the Western Roman Empire

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very old

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References in periodicals archive ?
Evidence for a conserved role of these genes more generally in arthropod eyes has been derived from a clever comparative analysis of gene expression between anciently diverged compound eyes and ocelli of Drosophila (Friedrich, 2006).
Frazer suggests that "the prytanis was anciently the king or perhaps rather the chief or headman of a petty independent town and that the prytaneum was his house" (147).
Dating couples experience today things that anciently only happened after the marriage, like trips, sexual relations and cohabitation, for example.
His Imagini followed five years later, a work of true mythography rather than an emblem book: instead of merely recording, it interprets classical mythology according to a tradition anciently established by Hesiod and continued (among many others) by Plato, the sixth-century scholar Fulgentius, and the Vatican mythographers--the anonymous authors of twelfth-century manuscripts based on the holdings of the Vatican library.
(12) These data support the consensus view that the Khoisan are the most anciently divergent human group, and have been significantly structured by long-term tribal separations since that ancient period.
In an apocryphal account, Hugo Ball even invokes the name of Dionysius the Areopagite--or at least his initials, D.A., repeated--as the origin of the term "Dada." Ramon del Valle-Inclan, as one of the founding members of the modernist avant-garde group, Spain's Generacion de '98, is the inheritor of a much more anciently evolved mystical discourse from both Christian and Muslim sources.
It must be agreed that many people and Nations have been overgrown with evill Customes and Barbarism, that they have imbased thir very human Nature to a degree not much superiour to Beasts as appeares at this day in many (e) of the Countryes of the West Indies, and (f) anciently in some remote /fol.
Indigoid pigments, a group of commodity chemicals, were anciently extracted from plants of Indigofera sp.
Pattern Example [E.sub.1] is commonly called Jisuanji (computer) is as [E.sub.2] commonly called as Diannao [E.sub.1] is abbreviated as Shanghai is abbreviated as Hu [E.sub.2] [E.sub.1] is also named as Hehua (lotus) is also named as [E.sub.2] Lianhua [E.sub.1] is also called as Oceania is also called as [E.sub.2] Australia [E.sub.1] is originally called Laoshe is originally called as as [E.sub.2] Shu Qingchun [E.sub.1] is anciently named Xi'an is anciently named as as [E.sub.2] Chang'an [E.sub.1] is [E.sub.2]'s Like is love's synonym synonym [E.sub.1] is [E.sub.2]'s Hu is Shanghai's abbreviation abbreviation TABLE 2: Lexicon-syntactic patterns of hyponymys in the sample sentences.
The discovery is that we affluent Westerners today enjoy a level of "happiness" no higher than that of the hunter-gatherers from whom we are anciently descended.
The present admirable constitution of the courts of justice in England was, perhaps, originally in a great measure, formed by this emulation, which anciently took place between their respective judges; each judge endeavouring to give, in his own court, the speediest and most effectual remedy, which the law would admit, for every sort of injustice.
Furthermore, anciently the hs-CRP was considered as an inert biomarker of inflammation now modified by evidences of its direct role in pro-inflammatory activity.
It lay there calm and small and quietly, anciently, beautiful.
On the one hand, the practice of medicine is not only a supremely important occupation, as Socrates anciently insisted; it is also the paradigmatic profession in our modern world.
Collins informs readers of his Peerage how the name of Brydges has many variant spelling and was "anciently written Brugge, Bruges, Burgh, Brigge, &c." (Collins 1:675).