anchorite


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  • noun

Synonyms for anchorite

one retired from society for religious reasons

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Dedicated to Cardinal Richelieu (1585-1642) and modelled on the Consolatio Philosophiae, the work consists of five books in alternating verse and prose sections, a dialogue between Theology and the unhappy Anchorite who became Pope Celestine V for five months in 1294.
33) Three late medieval versions of the wild man--the hairy anchorite, the mocking minstrel-knight, and the wild knight (milites silvani)--became popular figures in chivalric and sentimental narratives, and the objects of awed admiration in court masques.
Beasts direct Antony every step of the way and animals now live in harmony with the anchorite, even providing him with his needs.
A second, longer text, The Revelations, was written later, after she became an anchorite attached to the church of Saint Julian.
To illustrate my point, I will draw on an extreme example of the negation of a "desire for community," namely, the iconic figure of the "asocial human being," variously called hermit, anchorite, or misanthrope, though important nuances should be observed between these terms.
Absal assumes Hayy to be "another anchorite who had come to the island in search of solitude".
A London Anchorite, Simon Appulby: His Fruyte of Redempcyon and Its Milieu.
The dandy must be celibate, cloistral; is, indeed, but a monk with a mirror for beads and breviary--an anchorite, mortifying his soul that his body maybe perfect" (Zuleika 23).
What does this medieval anchorite, beloved of Anglicans, have to offer Lutherans?
This model was developed in Spanish-language regions around 1600, as a new synthesis of rigorously solitary anchorite life with the collective experience of the cenobite tradition, it evolved from medieval experience, permitting the gathering and integration of multiple hermetic units within a single monastic complex, and providing spaces and movement appropriate to rigorously hierarchical practice (Zimmermann 18-20; Recchia 52; Patetta 212 n.
While other theologians attempted to parse the profound mystery of the Trinity, the anchorite of Norwich took a simpler tack.
1971, XII, 2-4) and the feature more specifically characterizing it in the above mentioned excerpt is a state of anxious expectation for the presence of other anchorite brothers.
Mystical union is at the heart of all religion but Durrell derides not only the more conventional examples--Holy Communion, for example-but ignores the cenobite and anchorite tradition of which Egypt was the birthplace in the Western world.
Boccaccio draws elements from anchorite stories to complete his portrait of Beritola's wild exile, including life in a cave, the presence of deer and the prominent role of lactation.