anatomy

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Synonyms for anatomy

Synonyms for anatomy

the separation of a whole into its parts for study

Synonyms for anatomy

References in periodicals archive ?
Besides, there are times in American Anatomies where Wiegman's insistence on the primacy of "visual economies" is well taken, as when she argues, apropos those integrationist buddy films, that "in the frantic move toward representational integration, in both popular culture and the literary canon, the question of political power has been routinely displaced as a vapid fetishization of the visible has emerged to take its place." Here, Wiegman is pinpointing the Benettonization of race, and she's entirely justified in doing so.
It's telling, in this context, that American Anatomies never mentions David Roediger's groundbreaking work The Wages of Whiteness; perhaps Roediger's emphasis on labor and economics makes his work insufficiently broad and comprehensive for Wiegman's purposes, but then again his book undertakes an impressive analysis of how "race" in the United States has always exceeded the politics of the visible, and it's hard to imagine that Wiegman's analysis would not have benefitted from the challenge.
But more important is the fact that American Anatomies would surely have been a stronger book had it focused less on "the visible" than on the visible presence of critics who've discussed race in more insightful--and, yes, more comprehensive terms.
Some artists began to perform their own dissections,(45) while prominent citizens became a fixture at university anatomies, which later in the sixteenth century developed into theatrical events attracting an enthusiastic and often raucous crowd.
It is too simple to argue, as Heckscher does, that public anatomies directly inspired artists to produce work of this sort.(77) But the dissections, the images, and the grisly executions may all reflect in one way or another a culture of coercion and exemplary violence that characterized the theory and practice of absolutist rule.(78)