analogy

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  • noun

Synonyms for analogy

Synonyms for analogy

Synonyms for analogy

an inference that if things agree in some respects they probably agree in others

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drawing a comparison in order to show a similarity in some respect

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the religious belief that between creature and creator no similarity can be found so great but that the dissimilarity is always greater

References in periodicals archive ?
Four papers dealt with formal (symbol-string) analogies.
In terms of thinking like humans, analogies are where it's at," said Forbus, Walter P.
In the synectics model, Joyce and Weil (2000) describe three types of analogies to be used: personal analogy, direct analogy, and compressed conflict.
Walitt, however, acknowledged a cavea--that fibromyalgia is a very hard problem and that, even if we hadn't been chasing analogies we may still not be better off.
These analogies are visible in the poetry of Smith and Darwin which elucidates systematic botany by creating narrative and visual connections between plants and the technical information represented by their names, classes, and orders.
Avicenna identifies three ways in which the intensional similarities of absolute analogies are diversified by the intensional dissimilarities of their instances.
Luckily for O'Malley, the analogies and echoes from the past are those of a couple of relatively unknown governors of recent past named Jimmy Carter of Georgia and Bill Clinton of Arkansas.
Thus, we specifically designed two different analogies, one being relational salience analogy and the other one being surface salience analogy.
The central thesis of Douglas Hofstadter and Emmanuel Sander's massive new tome, Surfaces and Essences: Analogy as the Fuel and Fire of Thinking, is as follows: "the spotting of analogies pervade every moment of our thought .
In this challenging book for general readers, Pulitzer Prize-winner Hofstadter and co-author Sander (cognitive and developmental psychology, University of Paris) claim that the ability to make analogies lies at the root of human thought.
The second part -- thinking in analogies -- seems less broadly applicable.
In order to do this, we can make use of analogical pedagogy (James 2003, Harrison 1993, Clement 1993), which capitalizes on the promise that students can quickly learn basics by making analogies between a new skill to be learned and an already well-established skill.
Politicians and supporters of Israel often use analogies to try and paint the Palestinians as the bad guys, the villains who are responsible for the conflict, and the party that is responsible for there being no chance of peace.