allusive

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Synonyms for allusive

tending to bring a memory, mood, or image, for example, subtly or indirectly to mind

Words related to allusive

characterized by indirect references

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References in periodicals archive ?
The old man observes allusively regarding the protagonist's quest that the subdivision of larger apartments is to accommodate the many who seek shelter in New York.
Bodying forth the anxieties of a turbulent decade, the spectres in 1820s melodramas signify allusively rather than referentially.
The name is sometimes used allusively "with reference to the quick motion of which the metal is capable.
More allusively, passport-style pics of Ziad's two kids are photographed, as are his masbaha and several other seemingly "innocent" objects.
Rather, echoing Proust, memories irrupt into the text allusively, associatively indirectly.
The movement from one bit of dialogue to the next is not as question to reply or statement to response; it goes altogether more allusively.
Thus, allusively, once again, Lowry suggests the everlasting cycle of descent-ascent, or of death-renewal, which ends up constituting the image of the circle recurring also in the image of the wheel in Under the Volcano.
Because it is fleeting and irregular, as well as nonempirical, it cannot be accessed by scientific tests; it can only be evoked allusively and indirectly--precisely by means of something like a work of speculative sf.
At his press conference at the closing of the National People's Congress (NPC) meeting on March 14, 2012, then Premier Wen Jiabao allusively toned up his criticism of the Chongqing Model by pointing to the Cultural Revolution.
But lest this description make the whole thing sound too highfalutin or allusively "postmodern," rest assured that Lundgrens tricky Trude is his own creation, and that Norberg's dispirited search proves consistently moving and compelling.
This form of moral code not only allusively carries the Bai's correction over the Confucian dogma of feudal society, but also demonstrates the ultimate concern of human nature.
Through her discussion of fraud in the final chapter of the work Tarabotti allusively engages with the ethical dimensions of poetic mimesis that arise in Dante's text, exploring the risks faced in representing and denouncing evil through a series of allusions to Inferno sixteen and seventeen and Dante's encounter with the arch-traitor Count Ugolino in Inferno thirty-two to thirty-three.
As Michel Foucault explains through a series of texts, referring sometimes directly and sometimes allusively to early police thinkers and often as a way of trying to make sense of some of his better-known concepts such as pastoral power and governmentality, 'police' connotes a set of apparatuses and technologies constituting 'the economy' and the order of labour.
79) Miller's denigration, as Deleuze comments, can only then be rectified through a reader's engagement with text; "It is possible that the conceptual persona only rarely or allusively appears for himself, nevertheless, he is there, and however nameless, he must always be reconstituted by the reader," (80) referring us back to Nin's "agony of duality":
Poverty thus metonymically emerges as a form of dehumanizing exclusion (or perhaps more allusively, as a betise), if not imprisonment-a kind of (Hugolian) stereotype in nineteenth-century pauperography to be sure.