allegory

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Synonyms for allegory

Synonyms for allegory

a short moral story (often with animal characters)

an expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances

References in periodicals archive ?
as it has, it acquires from the allegorist (BENJAMIN, 2003, p.
Second, what the Renaissance allegorist sought to glimpse were the same mysteries that inspired the hierophants of the later Roman empire, when worship of Isis or Mithras or Orpheus was conducted in controlled rituals in which the votary acted out the psychological experience of dying to experience truth.
It is not a minor occupation: Dante was an allegorist, after all.
Sebald's faithfulness to the fragment as fragment, his refusal to think of it as part of an organic whole that can be reassembled, makes him an allegorist in the Benjaminian sense.
To comprehend how this device functions it is necessary to take into account that the allegorist plays with power.
Hamlet's newfound confidence in Providence can certainly be read as allegory "in a redemptive mode" (185), but is it not Horatio who is the allegorist at the end of the play with his account of "Trauerspiel-like contingencies and accidents" that accord with the audience's experience of causality throughout?
As the object is "incapable of emanating any meaning or significance of its own," the allegorist can now speak through it of "something different and for him it becomes a key to the realm of hidden knowledge" (184).
If on the one side in contemporary Bunyan scholarship we find those intent upon defending Bunyan the apologist and allegorist for his earnest presentation of an authentic if difficult spirituality, on the other hand we now have resourceful postmoderns who manage to call into question the reality of that other world to which Bunyan saw the Christian life as a journey.
Paralyzed, counting time, and crowded with thoughts, the allegorist De Quincey feels responsible only for warning the oncoming gig so that, at the very least, the death of its inhabitants, if they died, would not be the tragedy of (Christian) sudden death.
And yet, the turnaround of 2002-3 does mark a watershed and a point of no return for the Coetzee of old: the redoubtable allegorist of Waiting for the Barbarians and Life & Times of Michael K is gone for good, and in his place we have a brittle and acerbic late stylist, now preferring to allegorise the impossibility of allegory itself.
While in many of his other literary works Bunyan the theologian promotes the doctrine of election, Bunyan the allegorist emphasizes the necessity for works and action to earn salvation.
And here, suddenly it seemed, in one of the oldest, most highly regarded general circulation magazines in the country, Mailer the allegorist, the moralist, the fine novelist, was reporting on the 1967 Vietnam protest march in Washington, D.
Moreover, unlike the vast majority of Homer's allegorical readers, Chapman's oft-stated aim is to unearth and preserve the poet's original intent, a goal often, if not always, at cross-purposes with the hermeneutic methods and aims of the allegorist.
The postmodern allegorist "adds another meaning to the image [.
It is as an allegorist, in other words, that Benjamin reads him and shows him capturing the essential character of his age.