alien

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Synonyms for alien

foreign

extraterrestrial

extraterrestrial

Synonyms

alien to

Synonyms

  • unfamiliar to
  • opposed to
  • contrary to
  • separated from
  • conflicting with
  • incompatible with
  • inappropriate to
  • repugnant to
  • adverse to

Synonyms for alien

of, from, or characteristic of another place or part of the world

not part of the essential nature of a thing

a person coming from another country or into a new community

to change the ownership of (property) by means of a legal document

Synonyms for alien

a person who comes from a foreign country

anyone who does not belong in the environment in which they are found

a form of life assumed to exist outside the Earth or its atmosphere

transfer property or ownership

Synonyms

Related Words

arouse hostility or indifference in where there had formerly been love, affection, or friendliness

not contained in or deriving from the essential nature of something

Synonyms

Related Words

being or from or characteristic of another place or part of the world

Synonyms

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
The continuous "alienness" of the cosmopolitan traveler invites feeling wonder and surprise, delight at the newness of things, and taking the time to notice them.
She has had to become "resigned" to forgiveness; as she reflects on why she cannot help but forgive--even as she contemplates withholding her mercy "for an hour or two"--she recognizes that it is partly because of the (lifelong?) sense of alienness that Jack carries with him, as if he has always been at a distance from their ethos and speech, even perhaps parodying these, unconsciously or not.
Many theorists have used the language of alienness and infiltration to describe the state of oppressed consciousness; Sandra Bartky claims that patriarchy "invades" the intimate recesses of personality.
All this, one may charge, results in a text too alien in English; but that alienness is also the availability of the text to say something beyond what its translator made of it.
Marx is trying to distance us from this process--to denaturalise it--to get us to see it anthropologically, in its alienness and exoticism.
Yes, the alienness of American life to a Cuban boy is fully conveyed.
(11) Margot's narrative in Summertime is just one example in the book which underlines "John Coetzee's" alienness:
McKay seems to criticise Archer's description of the famous shrine island of Miyajima because the account does not resemble a travelogue, but instead focuses on the alienness of the Shinto ritual.
And opening a website is simultaneously being opened by it, which turns the will inside out and forces it into contact with its "own" alienness. Unlike Alistair's brand of intimacy, which represents the virtualization of reality, in a Zizekian reversal, Jeannie's represents the reality of the virtual.
They are nothing more nor less than caricatures of a sham alienness
His atheism, which was strongly criticized after the play's premiere, suggests more than mere adherence to a dubious philosophy: it connotes his alienness. Derek Hughes implicitly recognizes this when he acknowledges that Crowne's "enduring literary image of mankind" in The Destruction of Jerusalem is that of a "gathering of strangers," which expresses "the incoherence of a world where creeds are determined by culture." (34) When Phraartes confesses aesthetic appreciation for the splendor of the Temple--"Heaven does in no place appear / Treated with such magnificence as here...
The alienness of the UFO and its pilots stands for the perceived unnaturalness of the latest technologies of tradition, and their power to alienate by to some extent replacing face-to-face oral interaction as a means for transmitting information.
As Grosz notes, referring to Minkowski, "it is the outsideness, the fundamental alienness, of futurity to knowledge that is part of the awe and mystery, part of the hold that the future has over us as living subjects who are inevitably propelled forward"(21).
This is taken as a threat by Amy, as Hooper surmises, "by speaking to her child in a strange language, Yanko is, in Amy's eyes, trying to turn the child into a stranger, to replicate in the child his own alienness and difference" (1996:60).