algebra

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For algebraists, by contrast, the appropriate algebras are the monoidal algebras, not the algebras of logic, and among the monoidal algebras, the appropriate algebras are the right-algebras.
The second section, which is on algebra, was heavily cited by Renaissance algebraists in the years that followed its publication and is said to have been the enabling framework for the advances in algebra made in the 16th century [Rose, 1976, p.
In that respect--I said to him one day--he closely approached the attitude of the algebraists who vastly extended the science of forms and the symbolic aspect of their mathematical art.
The progressive dominance of power over reality and then eventually over consciousness itself, embodied by "a new knowledge [called Tlon] which, it is conjectured, is the work of a secret society of astronomers, biologists, engineers, metaphysicians, poets, chemists, algebraists" (Borges 7-8), could justly be termed mystical and demonic.
In recent times the so called weak hyperstructures have been in the centre of scientific interest of many algebraists. Weak hyperstructures with one or two hyperoperations appearing in connection with the representation theory (T.
As with preceding conferences held at the Athens campus of Ohio University, the one held in March 2005 offered a forum for algebraists to share their research.
(OC 1: 434/CF: 71) The narrator concludes, with the ultimate support of numerous scholars, that the Tlon described in the volume is the creation of "a secret society of astronomers, biologists, engineers, metaphysicians, poets, chemists, algebraists, moralists, painters, geometers, ..., guided and directed by some shadowy man of genius" (434-35/72).
In his Geometrie (1637) Descartes, although objecting to the "barbarous" notation of Arabic algebraists, followed Viete (who, surprisingly, is omitted from this History's biobibliographical index) and extended his analytic programme, drawing on Apollonius's Conics, as did Pierre de Fermat in his roughly contemporary work on plane and solid loci (726-30).
He suggests that a secret society of 'astronomers, biologists, engineers, metaphysicians, poets, chemists, algebraists, moralists, painters, geometricians ...