aircrew

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  • noun

Synonyms for aircrew

the crew of an aircraft

References in periodicals archive ?
Then, in collaboration with the Fire Department's Incident Commander, they planned an exhaustive aerial search pattern and launched an aircraft out of DuPage Airport, staffed with an all-volunteer aircrew, to perform the thorough search of the Highland Park to Lake Forest shoreline.
Some 537 RAF aircrew lost their lives and many others were injured.
Among the library and bookstore shelves filled with autobiographies of World War II aircrew members, In Hostile Skies stands out as a true gem.
Deciding to start his own business has now taken him to Abu Dhabi, where he is training eight aircrews for the United Arab Emirates country's Police Air Support unit, which patrols the whole of the UAE.
In 1952, the benchmark rose to 100 combat missions for fighter and reconnaissance aircrews, 100 missions (or nine months in theater) for forward air controllers, seventy combat missions (or nine months in theater) for all-weather fighters, fifty combat missions for light bombers (B-26s), and six months for medium bombers (B-29s).
Aircrew Systems (PMA 202) and Training Systems (PMA 205) are their largest customers, stretching across the three NAWC locations.
The Sniper ATP, a long-range precision targeting system, provides enhanced target identification for aircrew, allowing them to detect and analyze targets on the ground via real-time imagery.
A second C-17 is due to arrive in mid-to-late spring with two more aircrews.
The improved JPADS dramatically decreases this risk for the aircrews and aircraft.
Aircrews at the 351st Air Refueling Squadron have the same training, but rely on Sergeant Pratt for the updates.
Army aircrews deploying in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom have been equipped with this new-generation aircrew ensemble that provides advanced life support, ballistic protection, and chemical-biological protection in a system of mission-configured modules.
Most significant of the challenges were sourcing the aircraft, funding and sustaining the mission, building the FMS case for a customer with no C-130 infrastructure or experience, training of both aircrews and maintainers, English language training, in-country support of the mission, and oversight until such time as the Iraqis were able to completely run the operation.
Throughout the campaigns, coalition aircrews flew the right sorties at the right times for tactical and operational success.
If aircrews or ALSE inspectors report loose or torn snaps on the aircrew integrated recovery survival armor vest and equipment (AIRSAVE), it may be that the snaps are not seated with enough pressure.