aggress


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Synonyms for aggress

Synonyms for aggress

take the initiative and go on the offensive

References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, aggression not only depends on the strength of the association between the situation and aggressive behavior, but also the degree of readiness to aggress and the presence of aggressive cues (Berkowitz).
Girls are more likely to use RA "within" their friendship groups, for example, turning the entire group against one individual, whereas boys tend to aggress outside their friendship groups.
Employing the skills of some of its former combat arms soldiers, the battalion has fielded opposing forces (OPEOR) teams that aggress sister ARNG companies and battalions, reenforcing to those units the criticality of remaining tactically proficient in force protection, survivability, and rifle platoon tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTP).
110) Modern studies emphasize modern women's greater degree of social integration to account for both their reluctance to openly aggress and their reliance on indirect means, while early modern historians discuss the importance of women's social space as the arena in which witch-related activities took place.
The present study is a replication and extension of Stephens and Bredemeier's (1996) study of likelihood to aggress in female youth soccer players.
If a coworker is allowed to aggress against you, who's to say he or she won't go after someone else?
Agree instead of aggress, says Martin; ask questions rather than make statements; empathize and not give orders; and do not issue challenges.
He also said you could not pick who was going to aggress Arnie, because people from teenagers to 65-year-olds frequently became alarmed by the dog, who according to Clarke, is `only doing his job.
Serbia is not fighting to aggress on someone else's back yard.
Even with advanced dementias, men are much more likely than women to aggress," Boyd notes.
As discussed in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion (1995) by Gary Leak and Brandy Randall, "individuals who score high on the RWA scale are prone to aggress against unpopular or unconventional groups, feel morally superior and self-righteous, possess a mean-spiritedness that is coupled with vindictiveness and a `secret pleasure' when others experience misfortune, and appear prejudiced toward out-groups.
This right stems from the obligation not to aggress against anyone; this fight and this obligation are opposite sides of the same coin.
xiii) correctly points out, the war in the West became an aggress Native Americans: "It was a natural continuum of the prewar westward movement and the dispossession of Indian tribes.