impairment

(redirected from age-associated memory impairment)
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Synonyms for impairment

Synonyms for impairment

an act, instance, or consequence of breaking

Synonyms for impairment

References in periodicals archive ?
Crook, "A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of memantine in age-associated memory impairment (memantine in AAMI)," International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, vol.
Drug therapy and memory training programs: A double-blind randomized trial of general practice patients with age-associated memory impairment. Int Psychogeriatr.
Age-associated Memory Impairment and Related Disorders.
Meanwhile, in the elderly, a more consistent association is reported, probably due to other age-related factors like "age-associated memory impairment," "mild cognitive impairment," poor quality of life, low perception of one's health status, alterations in mood, and objective memory impairment.
The American Geriatrics Society (20) and American Academy of Neurology (AAN) (21) acknowledge the subtle difference between age-associated memory impairment and mild cognitive impairment, and the difficulty of differentiating normal changes of aging from abnormal changes.
The remaining chapters address such topics as age-associated memory impairment, cognition in Alzheimer's disease and related disorders, cognitive deficits as a core feature of schizophrenia, cognition in depression and mania, linking pre-clinical and clinical approaches to therapy for cognitive dysfunction in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, modulation of n-methyl-d-aspartate receptor function as a novel approach for development of antipsychotic agents, mechanisms of plasticity in molecular and cellular cognition, and functional imaging of cognition related brain circuitry in health and schizophrenia.
This early label was criticized and classified as age-associated memory impairment by Crooks in 1986 (Goldman & Morris, 2001), age-associated cognitive decline (Levy, 1994), and age-related cognitive decline in the DSM IV Criteria (Celsis, 2000), all of which fall within the limits of normal aging.
One study of healthy participants older than 50 years showed that 18.5% demonstrated age-associated memory impairment, (7) and the incidence of the clinical diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment is as high as 24% in persons older than 65 years.