affright

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Synonyms for affright

great agitation and anxiety caused by the expectation or the realization of danger

Synonyms for affright

References in classic literature ?
A thrust from the lance of a powerful Indian, however, completed his conquest, and the brute gave up his obstinate hold of life with a roar, that passed bellowing over the place where our adventurers stood, and, reaching the ears of the affrighted herd, added a new impulse to their flight.
As Seneca said, "Once we have driven away all that excites or affrights us, there ensues unbroken tranquility and enduring freedom."
Early in the play, Queen Margaret wishes that Richard will have 'no sleep' except 'while some tormenting dream | Affrights thee with a hell of ugly devils'.
In response to Cariola's cry of despair, the Duchess stoically replies "Peace, it affrights me not" (4.2.154).
And thus, though surrounded by circle upon circle of consternations and affrights, did these inscrutable creatures at the center freely and fearlessly indulge in all peaceful concernments ...
John, white robes are given to the redeemed, and the four-and-twenty elders stand clothed in white before the great-white throne, and the Holy One that sitteth there white like wool; yet for all these accumulated associations, with whatever is sweet, and honorable, and sublime, there yet lurks an elusive something in the innermost idea of this hue, which strikes more of panic to the soul than that redness which affrights in blood.
Or whence, if not From diabolical rage, could surge a yell So horrible as that which now affrights The shuddering dark?
By night she flits shrieking through the dusk betwixt sky and earth, nor declines her eyes in gentle sleep: by day she sits sentinel on the summit of a roof or stately tower, and affrights great cities, -- lover of the false and evil no less than herald of truth!
With scoffs and scorns and contumelious taunts In open market-place produc'd they me To be a spectacle to all: Here, said they, is the terror of the French, The scarecrow that affrights our children so.
(22) Likewise, while Herrick notes admiringly in his "Panegyrick to Sir Lewis Pemberton" that "no black-bearded Vigil from thy doore / Beats with a buttond-staffe the poore," in Pope's poem Cutler is shown making a positive point of warding away the destitute: "the gaunt mastiff growling at the gate, / Affrights the beggar whom he longs to eat" (197-98).
No sleep close up that deadly eye of thine, Unless it be while some tormenting dream Affrights thee with a hell of ugly devils.