affright

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Related to affrighted: dreading
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Synonyms for affright

great agitation and anxiety caused by the expectation or the realization of danger

Synonyms for affright

References in classic literature ?
A thrust from the lance of a powerful Indian, however, completed his conquest, and the brute gave up his obstinate hold of life with a roar, that passed bellowing over the place where our adventurers stood, and, reaching the ears of the affrighted herd, added a new impulse to their flight.
A chance bullet, coming nobody knows how or from whence, fired perchance by one that fled affrighted at the very flash of his villainous piece, may in a moment put a period to the vastest designs" J.
HELKIAH CROOKE ASSERTED IN Mikrokosmographia (1615) that the face was the signifier of the human: "At the beholding of this face, all creatures are affrighted, because in it there shine foorth more beames of the divine Nature, than in all the body besides.
She is sinking into her affrighted husband's arms, who strives with vain and frantic effort to avert the blow.
high, hunchbacked with a long face, long nose, and meeting eyebrows, so they who see him might be affrighted, with scanty hair with a parting in the middle of his head, after the manner of the Nazarites, and with an undeveloped beard.
So have I seen a bird with clipped wing making affrighted broken circles in the air, vainly striving to escape the piratical hawks.
Never popular in the army, his subordinates savoured his discomfort as Tecumseh accused him of cowardice, likening his conduct to "a fat animal that carries its tail upon its back, but when affrighted, drops it between its legs and runs off.
Luke 24:37 when Jesus appeared to his 11 gathered disciples after the crucifixion, the verse reads: But they were terrified and affrighted, and supposed that they had seen a spirit.
He cannot stand to see a reflection of himself, which intimates that he is not at home within himself as a substitution for others: "In truth, his own antipathy to the veil was known to be so great that he never willingly passed before a mirror, nor stooped to drink at a still fountain, lest, in its peaceful bosom, he should be affrighted by himself" (104).
Consider this statement of a later skeptic, David Hume, in contemplating the implications of is philosophy: "I am first affrighted and confounded with that forlorn solitude, in which I am plac'd in my philosophy, and fancy myself some strange uncouth monster, who not being able to mingle and unite in society, has been expell'd all human commerce, and left utterly abandon'd and disconsolate .
There was no such ages among ages, since ever all years began, Though your temples were high as the heavens: albeit your altars ran In blood as deep as the oceans: ye turned no whir from its path The heart of man that ye flattered with love, and affrighted with wrath
58) In the following book he offers what amounts to a redemption from the terror of the storm: "[I will explain how the furious storms] of winds arise, and how they are calmed, so that all is once mote what it was, changed and its fury appeased; and [I will explain] all else that men see happening in earth and sky; when they are often held in suspense with affrighted wits--happenings which abase their spirits through fear of the gods, keeping them crushed to the earth.
The French mercenaries among them were 'outrageously lascivious and lecherous' on a night of 'tyrannising over poor affrighted women and prisoners'.
Dickens's use of the grotesque style looms large in this novella and certainly in Poe's stanzas 3 and 4: the screams, affrighted "brazen bells" for the "fire stanza" and the "Ghouls" whose king "tolls" and "knells" in "Runic rhyme" grotesquely, reminding one of "Hop-Frog," clambering on the chandelier chain.