affright

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Related to affrighted: dreading
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Synonyms for affright

great agitation and anxiety caused by the expectation or the realization of danger

Synonyms for affright

References in periodicals archive ?
Thus the ambiguity--the sovereign immunity as and against the plague--was formed around the plague in this period, and the accession of the alien monarch caused great anxiety similar to the horror that made the audience in the Globe "affrighted."
abegen 'distended (with food)', aberd 'crafty, cunning', acol 'affrighted, dismayed'
Why thus affrighted at an empty Name, A Dream of Darkness, and fictitious Flame; Vain Themes of Wit, which but in Poems pass, And Fables of a World, that never was?
She is sinking into her affrighted husband's arms, who strives with vain and frantic effort to avert the blow.
Despite accepting guidance from the Daughters of Inspiration in plate 14/15, Poet Milton takes on a devilish dimension in the next plate of Milton (15/17:41-42, E 110), for Blake's Milton (as Milton's Satan) speeds through the undefined vortexes of space, where he "bent down," since "what was underneath soon seemd above." Blake addresses such a Miltonic subject in Night the Sixth of The Four Zoas (74:9, 30-39, E 351), where solarized Urizen (Milton's Satan in context) appears "ascending & descending" through "affrighted vales," (64) "dark precipices" in the voids.
"These Troubles," Proctor observes, "together with the strangeness of my husband's death, hath almost brought me to the Door of Death." However, for a woman much affrighted and hovering near her deathbed, she rallies very quickly.
Three cubits [4ft6in!] high, hunchbacked with a long face, long nose, and meeting eyebrows, so they who see him might be affrighted, with scanty hair with a parting in the middle of his head, after the manner of the Nazarites, and with an undeveloped beard."
So have I seen a bird with clipped wing making affrighted broken circles in the air, vainly striving to escape the piratical hawks.
The "warm imagination" contrasts dramatically with the farmer's "disturbed imagination" (190) and the "affrighted imaginations" (189) of his entire family after the War begins.
Wars worse than civil on Thessalian plains, And outrage strangling law, and people strong We sing, whose conquering swords their own breasts launched, Armies allied, the kingdom's league uprooted, Th' affrighted world's force bent on public spoil, Trumpets and drums like deadly threat'ning other, Eagles alike displayed, darts answering darts.
And in the face of that, and in the face of my own fear of being mocked for my faith, I now personally can appropriate those most precious Easter words, "Be not affrighted: Ye seek Jesus of Nazareth, which was crucified: He is risen; He is not here: behold the place where they laid Him" (Mark 16:6).
the concupiscence of dances and antics so reigneth, as to run away from Nature" ( The Alchemist "To The Reader" 7, 5-6) and the "rout" who are "so delighted" by "quaking Custards with fierce teeth affrighted" ( Volpone Prologue 22, 21).
Clare's death, as he "proceeded composedly with his work, amid the lamentations and sobs and cries of the affrighted servants." (46) Once again, Aiken further dramatizes this tension: as St.
Such was the imagination of the foreigners; but the Athenians, closing all together with the Persians, fought in memorable fashion; for they were the first Greeks, within my knowledge, who charged their enemies at a run, and the first who endured the sight of Median garments and men clad therein; till then, the Greeks were affrighted by the very name of the Medes'.
Othello's "affrighted globe" yawning at the huge eclipse of sun and moon, Hamlet's revenge-ridden, distracted globe where "conscience does make cowards of us all" and "great enterprises lose the name of action" under the barren, chilling, "pale cast of thought," Lear's deceased dominions and prison-paradise--"this great stage of fools" and Macbeth's darkness entombed earth of deep damnation--the stage of furiously sounded idiotic tales signifying nothing.