afeard


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Synonyms for afeard

Synonyms for afeard

a pronunciation of afraid

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Be not afeard. The isle is full of noises, Sounds, and sweet airs, that give delight and hurt not.
Art thou afeard To be the same in thine own act and valour, As thou art in desire?
(43.) There is further evidence for a 1592 dating in Lucy's final lines in the scene: "I'll bear them hence; but from their ashes shall be rear'd/A phoenix that shall make all France afeard" (4.7.92-93).
Winston Churchill, played by King's Speech actor Timothy Spall, stood atop Big Ben reciting the same lines from Shakespeare's The Tempest which helped open the Games 16 days ago: "Be not afeard: the isle is full of noises."
Winston Churchill - played by Timothy Spall - popped up on Big Ben, reading lines from Shakespeare's The Tempest which heralded the beginning of the Games: "Be not afeard: the isle is full of noises" And so we gave to the athletes whose talent has so profoundly moved us, and waved goodbye to the watching world with A Symphony of British Music.
The bell, produced by the Whitechapel Bell Foundry, is inscribed with a quote from The Tempest's Caliban: "Be not afeard, the isle is full of noises".
A lone woman is troubled with such dreams and such thoughts, that she's afeard of herself sometimes.
The ceremony will commence with the ringing of a giant bell emblazoned with a line from a speech by Caliban in William Shakespeare's The Tempest: 'Be not afeard, the isle is full of noises'.
The organisers have also commissioned the biggest ringing bell in Europe which will hang at one end of the stadium and bear an inscription from Shakespeare's The Tempest: "Be not afeard, the isle is full of noises".
Be not afeard: the isle is full of noises Sounds and sweet airs that give delight and hurt not.
This is a knavery of them to make me afeard. Enter Snout SNOUT O, Bottom, thou art changed.
In Act III, Caliban instructs Stephano and Trinculo: Be not afeard; the isle is full of noises, Sounds and sweet airs that give delight and hurt not.
The texts from The Tempest divide the song into four sections: first, a speech by Caliban from Act III ("Be not afeard; the isle is full of noises, sounds and sweet airs, that give delight, and hurt not"); second, a speech by Miranda from Act V ("O wonder!
(90) Harvard addition: 'I ain't afeard er no man dat walks dis yearth!