adduce

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Synonyms for adduce

Synonyms for adduce

to bring forward for formal consideration

Synonyms for adduce

advance evidence for

References in periodicals archive ?
This legislation provides that the representor is deemed not to have had reasonable grounds for making the representation 'unless [the representor] adduces evidence to the contrary'.
Some of the damning evidence he adduces is from conservatives themselves, who confess to playing up the liberal charge for partisan political advantage.
Yet he adduces no evidence to contradict this point.
As in the work of art, no ulterior reality hides behind the form: the form, totally manifest, adduces its own evidential power.
Finally, the article adduces arguments for loanwords from South Sulawesi languages in Malagasy (author's abstract).
Deskis adduces a very large range of analogues; since most of these date from after Beowulf's manuscript date there is no real scope for source study.
It is intriguing to imagine that both colloquial and formal vocabularies existed for Islamic architectural elements so close to their inception, but Bloom adduces no evidence for this idea.
Bertsch's book on Arribas, Oscar Tusquets adduces the tradition of apprenticeship for Catalan architects who prefer to work in some admired architect's studio, and if the opportunity arises do a little work of their own, `however modest it may be: bars, boutiques or private interiors'.
However the parallels he adduces deal rather with argumentative involution than with halting and inarticulate style.
On the other, Esposito adduces earlier comments by Buchanan which are indisputably unfriendly to Islam without making an attempt to resolve the discrepancy.
The evidence that Brzezinski adduces on the rise of nationalist tensions does little to buttress his audacious claim that only a global confederation will halt a slide into anarchy.
But by the end of his exposition, Wittreich adduces startling evidence that the figure of Samson becomes subject to a new hermeneutic in the latter half of the seventeenth century: one that calls on readers (with Herbert Thorndike) "to advise, whether sinful actions, and not according to God's own law, were fit to figure Christ" (175).
The author adduces some elements of Frege's philosophy that elucidate why he saw extensions as natural candidates for paradigmatic cases of logical objects.
He adduces this as a mitigating circumstance for the massacre but does not draw out how that designation fit into the larger, genocidal strategy of the American war effort.
But even this conclusion is weakly supported by the evidence Johnson adduces.