actress


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Synonyms for actress

a theatrical performer

Words related to actress

References in classic literature ?
The actress who played Marguerite was even then old-fashioned, though historic.
I suppose no woman could have been further in person, voice, and temperament from Dumas' appealing heroine than the veteran actress who first acquainted me with her.
For Prynne one of the great horrors of the stage was the introduction of actresses from France by Henrietta Maria, to take the place of young [84] male actors of whom Dr.
"You seem to be a little feverish tonight," said the actress.
"Why, it would be a game to cry over--not to laugh at!" said the actress.
Magdalen, in the character of a born actress, threatened serious future difficulties.
Before the actress of the evening had been five minutes on the stage, Norah detected, to her own indescribable astonishment, that Magdalen had audaciously individualized the feeble amiability of "Julia's" character, by seizing no less a person than herself as the model to act it by.
'I have known divine actresses before now, sir, I used to collect--at least I used to CALL for--and very often call for--the water-rate at the house of a divine actress, who lived in my beat for upwards of four year but never--no, never, sir of all divine creatures, actresses or no actresses, did I see a diviner one than is Henrietta Petowker.'
'Actresses, sir, always keep their maiden names--that's the regular thing--but I'm going to marry her; and the day after tomorrow, too.'
This was the part which she undertook to perform; and, indeed, she executed it so well, that none of our theatrical actresses could exceed her, in any of their performances, either on or off the stage.
He mentioned a French actress, and was going to tell something about her; but the ambassador's wife, with playful horror, cut him short.
"First of all," he said, bowing to the French actress and raising her fingers to his lips, "there is no one who does not know Madame Selarne.
The door was opened to them by an aged servant or "dresser", whose broken-down face and figure and black shabby coat and trousers contrasted queerly with the glittering interior of the great actress's dressing-room.
"Well, you see, sir," he continued, instinctively lowering his voice to a confidential impressiveness, "he married an actress; a noble lady too she was, a fine dashing merry lady as ever you saw.
It is impossible to describe the shrieks of joy, the warm embraces, the knocks, and the friendly greetings with which that strange company of dramatic actors and actresses received Pinocchio.