accusation

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Synonyms for accusation

Synonyms for accusation

a charging of someone with a misdeed

Synonyms for accusation

an assertion that someone is guilty of a fault or offence

References in classic literature ?
The roll call finished, the president ordered them to read the act of accusation.
Never till then had a more brutal accusation or meaner insults tarnished kingly majesty.
The second accusation he meets by interrogating Meletus, who is present and can be interrogated.
Leaving Meletus, who has had enough words spent upon him, he returns to the original accusation.
I judge only by the facts, the things you have said to me, your accusations against Captain Granet.
I will not therefore return to himself the charge brought against me but to himself Yes, Brian de Bois-Guilbert, to thyself I appeal, whether these accusations are not false?
Seeing that for such direct accusation before witnesses, if false or even mistaken, I should myself in a certain sense be made responsible, I am aware of that.
Seeing that his accusation of Sonia had completely failed, he had recourse to insolence:
He would also have inferred that Miss Letitia's inquiries had proved her accusation to be well founded--if he had known of the new teacher's sudden dismissal from the school.
You seem a worthy young man; I will depart from the strict line of my duty to aid you in discovering the author of this accusation.
Having heard his accusation from the mouth of Mrs Wilkins, he pleaded not guilty, making many vehement protestations of his innocence.
I have mentioned an accusation which has rested on me for years.
I have it in charge from Mr Boffin to discover, and I am very desirous for myself to discover, whether that retracted accusation still leaves any stain upon her.
But at least, Mamma, you cannot deny the absurdity of the accusation, though you may not think it intentionally ill-natured.
Winthrop, though possessed with a dim fear of dangers attendant on so long a journey, and requiring many assurances that it would not take them out of the region of carriers' carts and slow waggons, was nevertheless well pleased that Silas should revisit his own country, and find out if he had been cleared from that false accusation.