accent

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Synonyms for accent

Synonyms for accent

a particular vocal quality that indicates some emotion or feeling

special weight placed upon something considered important

Synonyms for accent

distinctive manner of oral expression

special importance or significance

the usage or vocabulary that is characteristic of a specific group of people

the relative prominence of a syllable or musical note (especially with regard to stress or pitch)

a diacritical mark used to indicate stress or placed above a vowel to indicate a special pronunciation

References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Rima Sabban, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Zayed University, said people might have this perception about accents because the UAE, like most countries, has a hierarchy of ethnicity.
Gulf News conducted another poll asking people if they have ever westernised their accents, and 30 per cent of the 945 participants said yes while 70 per cent said they never did.
Clinical Psychologist and Managing Director of The Light House Arabia Dr Saliha Afridi said there are psychosocial reasons why someone would want to change or fake their accents.
A SURVEY shows people with Brummie and other regional accents are seen as "unsuccessful" in the business world.
The survey by communications consultancy The Aziz Corporation highlights the prejudice against regional accents, with 79 per cent of people believing they are a disadvantage in business.
But 64% of business people regard those with a Liverpudlian tone as being generally unsuccessful, followed by those with a Birmingham or West Midlands accent (63%), a cockney accent (52%) and Geordie or West Country accents (48%).
An overseas accent is better for success in commercial life than some homegrown ones, the study found.
The business community is full of prejudice against English regional accents, according to a survey published today.
By contrast, 64% of busin- esspeople regard those with a Liverpudlian tone as being generally unsuccessful, closely followed by those with a Birmingham or West Midlands accent (63%), a cockney accent (52%) and Geordie or West Country accents (48%).
The call center industry is extracting a sliver of Indians who are actively de-Indianizing themselves and adopting Western names and identities, accents and culture.
A board next to Gill urged the students to "conquire (sic) the heights of their carrier (sic)." It also urged them to "speak correct language without making any mistakes" and to "overcome regional accents in our speech and to have correct pronunciation."
Civil rights enforcers admit there are some circumstances where employers may legitimately consider accents. They just take an ultra-narrow view of what's legitimate.
Donaldo Macedo, described as "director of graduate studies in bilingual education" at a local university, accused the parents of "linguistic racism" and declared to the Boston Globe that "there's not a single piece of research in linguistics that shows children who are raised by someone with a heavy accent acquiring that accent" - a curious assertion that would seem to raise the question of how kids ever happen to grow up with heavy accents at all (as well as sidestepping parents' concerns, of which the actual transmission of accent was probably not the most important).