abscond

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Synonyms for abscond

escape

Synonyms

Synonyms for abscond

to break loose and leave suddenly, as from confinement or from a difficult or threatening situation

Synonyms for abscond

References in periodicals archive ?
It may be noted that if an employee absconds and his whereabouts are not known and if later traced in the UAE on the basis of complaint made by his employer, such employee may be detained and later deported to his home country if proven guilty by the Court on charges of absconding.
Absconds, where prisoners are able to leave prisons that are fully or partially open, happened seven times at Prescoed prison in 2018/19.
And a spokesman for the prison service said: "The number of absconds at HMP Sudbury has fallen by more than a half in the last 10 years.
But what happens if the maid absconds? The sponsor should report to authorities right away or within seven days of the maid going missing.
Moreover, a study reported that the mean age of absconders was 31.70 years and 95.30% of absconds were male and the most of them were single (8).
Mr Hobbs added: "I must stress that we do not pro-actively seek the help of the public or the media on every occasion that a prisoner absconds."
Ms Cooper said absconds had stopped under control orders once the powers were toughened up - including greater use of relocation.
But Matthew Coats, head of immigration at the UK Border Agency, said: "When an individual absconds we circulate information and use intelligence to track them down.
"The number of absconds from open prison is at its lowest level since centralised reporting of this type of incident began in 1995.
"Following the actions of this Scottish government to tighten the criteria for admission to the open estate, absconds from the open estate are now at a record low level - 16 in 2008/09, compared to 79 in 2006/07 and 98 in 1996/97."
"The number of absconds is at its lowest level for a decade and 95% of absconds are rearrested and returned to custody."
Shadow home secretary David Davis claimed: "John Reid knew about the risk of absconds due to his policy of transferring dangerous offenders to open prisons."
Shadow home secretary David Davis said: "A leaked Home Office memo shows John Reid knew about the risk of absconds due to his policy of transferring dangerous offenders to open prisons.
"This massive number of absconds is unacceptable and shows that the Government have been consistently failing in their duty to protect the public," said Mr Davis.