abortion-inducing drug


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Synonyms for abortion-inducing drug

a drug (or other chemical agent) that causes abortion

References in periodicals archive ?
No physician who provides RU-486 (mifepristone) or any abortion-inducing drug shall knowingly or recklessly fail to provide or prescribe the RU-486 (mifepristone) or any abortion-inducing drug according to the protocol tested and authorized by the U.
In Oklahoma, HB 2561 made it legal to sue abortion providers, or anyone who prescribes abortion-inducing drugs, if they do not abide by a law requiring women to undergo an ultrasound and fetal heartbeat monitoring session prior to the operation.
Following the FDA regimen for abortion-inducing drugs isn't unsafe, but it is less effective and has more side effects than the evidence-based protocol followed by most abortion providers, said Fine, who participated in the FDA's clinical trial for Mifeprex, the abortion-inducing drug.
An Edinburgh University team have finished the first stages of research into the pill which is made from an abortion-inducing drug.
The legislation bans abortion at 20 weeks post-fertilization and recognizes that the state has a compelling interest to protect fetuses from pain; requires doctors performing abortions to have hospital admitting privileges within 30 miles of the facility; requires doctors to administer the abortion-inducing drug RU-486 in person, rather than allow the woman to take it at home; and requires abortions - including drug-induced ones - to be performed in ambulatory surgical centers.
Another provision of the bill, which requires doctors to administer the abortion-inducing drug RU-486 in person, rather than allowing the woman to take a second dosage at home, came under fire from Sen.
HB 2 contains four main provisions: It would ban abortion at 20 weeks post-fertilization and recognize that the state has a compelling interest to protect fetuses from pain; require doctors performing abortions to have hospital admitting privileges within 30 miles of the facility; require doctors to administer the abortion-inducing drug RU-486 in person, rather than allow the woman to take it at home; and require abortions - including drug-induced ones - to be performed in ambulatory surgical centers.
Senate Bill 1 and its companion, House Bill 2, would ban abortion at 20 weeks post-fertilization and recognize that the state has a compelling interest to protect fetuses from pain; require doctors performing abortions to have hospital admitting privileges within 30 miles of the facility; require doctors to administer the abortion-inducing drug RU-486 in person, rather than allow the woman to take it at home; and require abortions - including drug-induced ones - to be performed in ambulatory surgical centers.
HB 2, and its companion, Senate Bill 1, would ban abortion at 20 weeks post-fertilization and recognize that the state has a compelling interest to protect fetuses from pain; require doctors performing abortions to have hospital admitting privileges within 30 miles of the facility; require doctors to administer the abortion-inducing drug RU-486 in person, rather than allow the woman to take it at home; and require abortions - including drug-induced ones - to be performed in ambulatory surgical centers.
The measure also would require doctors who administer the abortion-inducing drug, RU-486, do so in person.
The Court will determine if Obamacares employer mandate for non-profit entities to provide insurance coverage for abortion-inducing drugs and contraception is constitutional.
Globally, the ratio of abortion-related deaths per 100,000 live births has declined due to improvements in abortion-related technology, clandestine use of abortion-inducing drugs and, to a lesser extent, increases in improved PAC.
Right now the federal government is suing the Little Sisters of the Poor to try to force Catholic nuns to pay for abortion-inducing drugs.
Their lawsuit claims the mandate infringes on the Wielands' religious liberty--(they are identified in the appeals court ruling as "devout Roman Catholics")-under the First Amendment, because it provides health insurance coverage of abortion-inducing drugs and birth control to their teenage and adult daughters, which conflicts with their sincerely held religious beliefs.