abolition

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Synonyms for abolition

Synonyms for abolition

Synonyms for abolition

the act of abolishing a system or practice or institution (especially abolishing slavery)

References in classic literature ?
And the abolition of this state of things is called by the bourgeois,abolition of individuality and freedom
This talk about free selling and buying, and all the other "brave words" of our bourgeoisie about freedom in general, have a meaning, if any, only in contrast with restricted selling and buying, with the fettered traders of the Middle Ages, but have no meaning when opposed to the Communistic abolition of buying and selling, of the bourgeois conditions of production, and of the bourgeoisie itself.
It has been objected that upon the abolition of private property all work will cease, and universal laziness will overtake us.
But don't wrangle with us so long as you apply, to our intended abolition of bourgeois property, the standard of your bourgeois notions of freedom, culture, law, etc.
For the rest,it is self-evident that the abolition of the present system of production must bring with it the abolition of the community of women springing from that system, i.
Abolition of property in land and application of all rents of land to public purposes.
Combination of agriculture with manufacturing industries; gradual abolition of the distinction between town and country, by a more equable distribution of the population over the country.
Abolition of children's factory labour in its present form.
With the abolition of private property, marriage in its present form must disappear.
The leading article protests against 'that abominable and hellish doctrine of abolition, which is repugnant alike to every law of God and nature.
Second, he analyses a series of major abolitions and argues that in no case were they influenced by slave resistance.
One of the sources of debate is the connection of the abolition movement to nineteenth-century imperialism, a topic' linked to a 65-year exchange on Eric Williams's Capitalism and Slavery.
Subsequently, it transformed the whole world, by inspiring millions of other victims of oppression in their quest for liberty, a movement that resulted in a crescendo of abolitions and emancipation most notably in America and Europe, and independence of African nations around the world.
On 25 March, Africans from around the globe came together to commemorate the bicentennial celebration of Britain's abolition of the slave trade.
From 12 till 14 April 2007, the University of York (UK) will host a conference that looks at the meaning and impact across the Atlantic world of the formal abolition of the slave trade in 1807.