ability

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  • noun

Synonyms for ability

Synonyms for ability

physical, mental, financial, or legal power to perform

natural or acquired facility in a specific activity

Synonyms for ability

References in periodicals archive ?
He could hardly contain his excitement; how great and mighty he felt he would be, if only those were the abilities.
According to several researchers, there are three major spatial elements used to test the spatial abilities of an individual--spatial relations, spatial orientation, and spatial visualization:
First and foremost, the most just way to evaluate people is based on their individual abilities and accomplishments rather than on the general abilities of whatever gender they espouse (remember the case of Stanford neurobiologist Ben A.
With the growing importance of soft skills as described above, traditional career development activities that focus on assessing specific existing abilities or potential aptitude for particular job tasks are becoming less and less useful.
Early on, he learned to establish trust relationships by sharing information and relying on the competence and abilities of others to do their jobs.
Pink: It's precisely those hard-to-automate, hard-to-outsource abilities I just mentioned.
The CDP is also an opportunity for NAVSEA employees to accelerate their careers and significantly increase their abilities to contribute to NAVSEA's mission and to contribute to their own self-development.
Breaking up your different abilities into several small groups of equal ability and leaving them in the same room to work together, with a pitiful input from an overstretched teacher can, and does, lead only to chaos.
* Nurture an attitude of openness about discovering new things about your abilities and the music.
In order to produce learned, well-spoken alumni, IHEs nowadays need to assess the skills and abilities of students when they first walk onto campus.
There is no connection to future learning or ways to improve a student's abilities.
It is telling that Willingham does not argue against the existence of human abilities outside the academic domains, such as kinesthetic skill, musical talent, and social insight.
For persons with disabilities, a long-used strategy in job placement was to match the person's abilities and interests to those matching people in a certain occupations (Szymanski, Hershenson, Enright, & Ettinger, 1996).
With the unemployment rate surging to 6.4 percent in June 2003, its highest level in over nine years, employers in the seasonal job market are attempting to highlight skills, competencies, and abilities that can contribute to future employability.