abide

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Synonyms for abide

Synonyms for abide

to continue to be in a place

to stop temporarily and remain, as if reluctant to leave

to be in existence or in a certain state for an indefinitely long time

to have as one's domicile, usually for an extended period

abide by: to act in conformity with

Synonyms for abide

References in periodicals archive ?
commit crime--the eventual law abiders. Equality in false-negative rates
They demanded from Education Minister Atif Khan and other High Official to look into the matter and take strike action against law abiders.
Researchers have developed a five-category model that they have termed The Five As in which different aspects of individual religious beliefs are combined and blended as follows: abiders, adapters, assenters, avoiders, and atheists (Pearce, Foster, & Halliday Hardie, 2013).
As if that weren't enough, Drew also learns of the Abiders, another secret group whose goal is to eradicate Changers.
Rehnquist instinctively knew whose side he was on when it came to criminals and law abiders, minorities and the white majority, the poor and the rich, the powerless and the powerful.
Defying the belief that the American justice system protects the law abiders from the law-breakers, James instead argues that courts often are supported and maintained by convictions and that winning--not truth --is paramount.
If this index is applied for Bamdezh wetland and social index such as benefit of abiders of 36 villages near wetland from agriculture, ranch and fishery add to economic value, this wetland profit more than 14000$ benefit annual or the Bamdezh wetland has this potential.
Racketeering is doubly compounded as it necessitates greater tax burden on law abiders. The most crucial problem faced by us is taking stringent measures to curb tax evasion, thus, distributing the burden of taxes fairly and justly in society.
"It gives bad actors an advantage over law abiders, and prevents consumers from voting with their pocketbooks."
They crossed over in good order, helping each other, the good, the bad, the cruel, and the indifferent, the law makers and the law abiders. ...
The EU would do everyone a great service by adopting a policy that, at its most simple, rewards law abiders and punishes law breakers.
First of all, who's going to make up the normal group--people of the same sex, socioeconomic status, background, or people who are actual, if you have someone in question of violating the law, people who are in question who are law abiders? The other interesting thing about this is that experiments in general--basically all of what we know from functional brain imaging--are done on groups of subjects and is finding they're averaged.
When we impose severe and excessive punishment, when we seek an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth, a life for a life, when we seek revenge on lawbreakers by some clumsy arithmetic we call justice, we become violent law abiders. We become what we say we abhor--more like criminals--more violent people.
Laws divide people into law abiders and "others," into "us" and "them." In a sense, the criminal who breaks the law is freer than those who make the laws that supposedly protect our freedoms.
How then, Harcourt asks in a series of questions, does one distinguish between the disorderly and the law abiders? "What are the distinctions between difference, eccentricity, disorder, and criminality?