Yeats


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Synonyms for Yeats

Irish poet and dramatist (1865-1939)

References in periodicals archive ?
Visitors' maps lead to abbeys, churches, and other historical sites around town, but somehow, people seem to gravitate toward Wine Street, where the Yeats Memorial Building stands.
For example, the binary operation of masculine hegemony and female subordination underlying Irish cultural nationalism emerges repeatedly in Yeats's poems, such as "No Second Troy" and "A Prayer for My Daughter." Yeats's time-honored poem "Leda and the Swan" helps explain this negligence, or blindness to oneself, that is somehow characteristic of the most heavily patriarchal writing.
The 6ft 2in Yeats was centre-half for United as they won promotion back to the top flight in 1960 after a wait of years.
"The horse in question was Yeats, his summer break at Coolmore Stud having had his third season as a stallion.
The project, initiated and supervised by Dr Anastasia Remoundou-Howley, assistant professor of English literature, was undertaken collectively by 12 students of English literature as part of a course in modernism during which Yeats was studied.
By so situating himself, Yeats is in position of the tradition's most rich inheritor and its historian, able to write its epitaph in such a way as to redeem, critique, or determine (and so, surpass?), its overwhelming or famishing effects, depending on the story he chooses to tell.
[T]he broad based cultural renaissance for which Yeats was a symbol, spokesman, and literary architect took up the Irish past not as a nostalgic lost origin, but as a reality that persisted, in suppressed or marginalized forms, in the ongoing Irish present and could, accordingly, provide a renovated cultural foundation on which to build the Irish future.
William Butler Yeats was born in Sandymount, in Dublin Ireland on June 13th 1865.
A Vision was, however, a success in other areas, particularly in its construction of a complex mythological foundation for Yeats's poetry.
The druids bind Cuchulain to turn his rage upon the waves until his grief is expended (Yeats "Cuchulain" 105-111).
Perhaps because he was excessively concerned with moving Yeats away from florid expression and towards the stark economy of language that was becoming a staple of modernism, Pound seems to have willfully ignored the decadent motifs that still informed Yeats's imagination well into his career.
The Yeats circle, verbal and visual relations in Ireland, 1880-1939.
And the Coolmore connection will again be in evidence, for Langton's latest and potentially most popular creation, due to be unveiled in the Ascot parade ring before racing, is a bronze of four-time Gold Cup winner Yeats.
Yeats. Like most authors whose work presents numerous difficulties of interpretation, Yeats has generated a scholarly literature that is strongly exegetic in character, and the biographical and contextual scholarship on the poet supports an effort of understanding that his complex and often esoteric body of writings requires.