utilitarian

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Related to Utilitarians: deontologists, Kantians
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Synonyms for utilitarian

Synonyms for utilitarian

serving or capable of serving a useful purpose

Synonyms for utilitarian

someone who believes that the value of a thing depends on its utility

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having a useful function

Synonyms

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having utility often to the exclusion of values

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References in periodicals archive ?
Singer is a thoroughgoing utilitarian, whereas my sense is that most animal researchers are utilitarians when it comes to animals, but rights theorists when it comes to humans.
On so doing, he says, the reader will be provided with the opportunities of examining some essentials of the debate on punishment, which as it turns out means the debate between the utilitarian justification for punishment and that of the retributivist.
present a collection of 56 writings by the utilitarian political and moral philosophers and their critics.
There may be utilitarian reasons for specific social behaviors but not moral ones.
Kant and the utilitarians were not trying to say what should be moral but to describe the underlying logic by which we justify our actions.
But if this is the basis of Audi's distinction, it is unclear why utilitarians must be externalists.
If we look at their arguments, we see that utilitarians look to the future, while the Natural Law looks to the present moment.
First, he attempts to bridge the gulf between those who argue for private property, individual rights, and freedom of contract from a "natural law" perspective and those who advance these ideas from a more utilitarian perspective.
It's what's wrong with much of modern economic thought, this utilitarian rationalism--in Stigler's political economy as against Friedman's, or in Richard Posner's law and economy as against Ronald Coase's.
In other words, do utilitarians endorse harming one to save many simply because they endorse harmful, selfish acts more generally?
Utilitarians tolerate self-benefiting actions only in that context.
Logsdon asserts, "drawing instruction was viewed as a means to an economic end, [so] the policy philosophically shares more with the 'greater good' thesis espoused by utilitarians than with pragmatism's notion of an individual's considered inquiry into an array of potential life consequences.
Given this individual's demonstrated propensity to commit crime, utilitarians consider this criminal a threat to society--that is to say, the criminal's demonstrated propensity to commit crimes indicates he is likely to commit future crimes and thus is bound to cause pain to others.
In the face of rampant philosophical diversity, utilitarians too often miss the point and ask whether pluralism is good for utility when they ought to step back and consider that others would like to rule according to their dogma too.
Utilitarians, like John Stuart Mill or Jeremy Bentham, judge a moral action as that which causes the greatest amount of good for the most people.