Supreme Court of the United States

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Synonyms for Supreme Court of the United States

the highest federal court in the United States

References in periodicals archive ?
The Wisconsin Department of Justice recently chose Assistant Attorney General Hannah Jurss to represent the state of Wisconsin in oral arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court in State v.
"The U.S. Supreme Court in 2016 affirmed the University of Texas' efforts to enroll a diverse student body that provides educational benefits for all students," UT-Austin President Gregory L.
After the Court asked the Bar, which was named in the appeal because it stemmed from a grievance case, to file a response, the Bar complied and agreed that the U.S. Supreme Court should take the case because of disparate rulings on the issue from different courts around the country.
Courtesy is also the word a spokeswoman for the U.S. Supreme Court used.
Armed with the bill, Schiavo's parents made an emergency appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court to have the patient's feeding tube reinserted.
* The U.S. Supreme Court has refused to hear an appeal of a case from Maine that sought to force local education officials to provide tax support for private religious schools.
The initiative to get MCRI on the ballot first emerged in 2003, when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the University of Michigan could continue using race as a factor in its admissions.
Bellotti being heard on appeal by the U.S. Supreme Court. In 1976 the justices remanded the case to the lower court in order to give the legislative body a chance to make the statute more flexible.
The U.S. Supreme Court itself has recognized that the antidiscrimination provisions within Title VII do not prohibit "genuine but innocuous differences in the ways men and women routinely act with members of the same sex and of the opposite sex ...
The U.S. Supreme Court's approval of the posting of the Ten Commandments outside the state capitol in Texas and disapproval of their posting inside Kentucky courthouses.
In 1896, by an 8-to-I vote, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld Louisiana's right to establish "separate but equal" railway coaches.
The U.S. Supreme Court will hear a case involving Ohio's Machinery and Equipment Tax Credit program, which was ruled unconstitutional last year by a U.S.
Two U.S. Supreme Court rulings, 76 years apart, capture the elusiveness of insurance as a regulatory target.