Tom

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Synonyms for Tom

(ethnic slur) offensive and derogatory name for a Black man who is abjectly servile and deferential to Whites

References in classic literature ?
Koku was an immense man, a veritable giant, one of two whom Tom had brought back with him after an exciting trip to a strange land.
"Now Tom, about this business of leasing to the English Government the right to manufac- ture that new explosive of yours," began Ned, plunging into the business at hand.
When school broke up at noon, Tom flew to Becky Thatcher, and whispered in her ear:
Then they sat together, with a slate before them, and Tom gave Becky the pencil and held her hand in his, guiding it, and so created another surprising house.
"I'm sure I haven't, father," said Tom, indignantly.
It was Tom's step, then, that Maggie heard on the stairs, when her need of love had triumphed over her pride, and she was going down with her swollen eyes and dishevelled hair to beg for pity.
'You think so, don't you?' said Tom. And shut up his eye again.
James Harthouse smiled; and rising from his end of the sofa, and lounging with his back against the chimney-piece, so that he stood before the empty fire-grate as he smoked, in front of Tom and looking down at him, observed:
In babyhood Tom cuffed and banged and scratched Chambers unrebuked, and Chambers early learned that between meekly bearing it and resenting it, the advantage all lay with the former policy.
Chambers was strong beyond his years, and a good fighter; strong because he was coarsely fed and hard worked about the house, and a good fighter because Tom furnished him plenty of practice-- on white boys whom he hated and was afraid of.
Of this latter sort was old Farmer Ives, as he was called, the "wise man" to whom Benjy resorted (taking Tom with him as usual), in the early spring of the year next after the feast described in the last chapter.
Tom played about with some kittens who occupied the hearth, and with a goat who walked demurely in at the open door--while their host and Benjy spread the table for dinner--and was soon engaged in conflict with the cold meat, to which he did much honour.
One snowy Sunday afternoon Tom lay on the sofa in his favorite attitude, reading "Pendennis" for the fourth time, and smoking like a chimney as he did so.
What's the matter?" asked Tom, throwing down his book with a yawn that threatened dislocation.
'"Well, damn my straps and whiskers," says Tom Smart