thrift

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Synonyms for thrift

Synonyms for thrift

careful use of material resources

Synonyms for thrift

any of numerous sun-loving low-growing evergreens of the genus Armeria having round heads of pink or white flowers

extreme care in spending money

References in periodicals archive ?
Global Banking News-October 7, 2014--S&T Bancorp named to 2014 Bank & Thrift Sm-All Stars list
Note: Prudential is in the process of selling off deposits and converting its thrift to a trust bank.
thrift industry suffered a $4 billion loss during the third quarter of 2008, according to an Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS) report.
Rather, it merely conditioned the taxpayer's obligations on its receipt of a charter from the FHLBB to operate in the state in which the insolvent thrifts were operating.
Among them, the central bank has additional currency inventory, and it has created a special borrowing facility to ensure that banks and thrifts have access to funds if needed for their Y2K preparations.
The ``Know Your Customer'' program, as it is called by the four federal agencies that proposed it last winter, would force banks and thrifts to monitor their customers' transactions and financial patterns.
Because of their poor financial condition, some of these thrifts could not provide adequate collateral (that is, eligible assets) to secure their FHLBank loans.
Not long after, all the thrifts on Greenspan's list had failed but one, and the survivor--although Greenspan didn't seem to know it--was not a thrift.
Rubin did say, however, that the thrift industry's return on assets is half that of the banking industry, and there are 51 thrift institutions with $27.
Thrifts would pay nearly four times as much as banks into their respective insurance funds.
The other reality is that Dime Bancorp faces the task of consolidating its operations while continuing to reduce the debt loads of the two merged thrifts.
Thrifts commonly distinguished from commercial banks as they were regulated by different agencies and were insured by different insurance corporations.
1) Public concern about the enormous cost of the cleanup, though certainly justified, obscures an important fact: Unlike industries that require insolvent institutions to renegotiate with creditors immediately or under Chapter 11 protection (see Gilson, John, and Lang |17~), thrifts often operate in an insolvent condition for extended periods.
The Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act of 1989 (FIRREA) mandates that all thrifts divest themselves of their investments in CMO residuals, as well as certain other direct real estate investments, by 1994.
In addition, the number of private-sector thrifts, which includes both savings banks and savings and loans, showing a profit rose to 1,936, or 85 percent of the group, from 1,808 or 72 percent in December 1989, and 1,769 or 76 percent in December 1990.