Thoreau

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Synonyms for Thoreau

United States writer and social critic (1817-1862)

References in periodicals archive ?
Otterberg contends also that just as Thoreau "comprehends literature [...] as permeated and directed by its author's ethos, he correspondingly [emphasis added] tends to see nature as fundamentally law-bound, this core trait sanctioned either by a deity akin to the Christian God, as hinted in early Thoreauvian texts, or by a more self-sufficient and protoecological regime of interaction, cooperation, and development, as presented in later ones" (238-39).
The next glimpse we get of Stevenson and his encounter with Thoreau, specifically with the palpable materiality of Thoreauvian texts, came from San Francisco in a sketch by Charles Warren Stoddard, then special correspondent of the San Francisco Chronicle and later Professor of English at Notre Dame and Catholic University: "I have visited him in a lonely lodging in California, it was previous to his happy marriage, and found him submerged in billows of bed-clothes,.
Even one as unskilled as Christopher McCandless was able to harvest a moose with a Remington .22 Long Rifle during his ill-fated Thoreauvian period of solitary contemplation in Alaska.
By declining to confine environmental literature to Thoreauvian nature writing and lyric poetry, she brings an array of women's voices into conversation with one another in ways that challenge easy understandings of what counts as environmental literature.
Edmund Banfield, the Thoreauvian recluse of Dunk Island, is a mighty figure in histories of the Reef.
The following Thoreauvian questions have been fundamental to literary ecocriticism: can humans speak for "Nature"?
In my attempts to become a Thoreauvian walker, I have faced many impediments, but I have also had time to wonder if there might not be ways to achieve Thoreau's goal by methods other than those he used--to reach the same destination by a different path, to use a walking metaphor.
Published in 2013, Thoreauvian Modernities offers a collection of new essays giving evidence for the latter claim.
Francois Specq, Laura Dassow Walls and Michel Granger (eds.) Thoreauvian Modernities: Transatlantic Conversations on an American Icon Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2013 ISBN 978-0820344287 (HB) [pounds sterling]59.50.
When Kenneth Silverman states that the transition from Puritanism to the Enlightenment "marks the establishment of two enduring visions of America that have often competed for authority," he maintains that "despite ceaseless celebrations of The American Dream, Americans have often been divided by their allegiance to one of Two American Dreams," the Franklinian (materialist) and the Thoreauvian (spiritual) (111-112).
Glen Theatre, throwing brevity to the wind, he castigated the dissenters for adopting a "Thoreauvian 'you-maydo-what-you-like-so-long-as-it-does-not-injure-someone-else, beau ideal...." (7)
Mozi's practicality admittedly manifested itself in his own Spartan way of living, marked by a remarkable degree of Thoreauvian self-sufficiency bordering on self-abnegation.
"With the help of Thoreau," says Ingman, he exposes a "conceptual oversight in experiential education; ultimately calling for a reconsideration of spirituality in human experience, and a reevaluation of experiential education in light of the Thoreauvian conception of spiritual-experiential learning." It so happens that in Volume 13 of his journals Thoreau wrote:
But their soporific self-sufficiency, which Kafka and Levinas describe via a tropology of culinary excess, indexes a broader opacity and subsequently, especially in the Thoreauvian withdrawal and self-deprivation of Auster's novels, the artist's refusal to play along, to accept the sociopolitical status quo underpinning this satiated blindness to an other's presence and needs.
(13.) If one's perspective on this idea is Thoreauvian rather than Emersonian, the perceptible presence of rags in paper is a virtue, bespeaking experience and authenticity.