ballad

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Synonyms for ballad

song

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Synonyms for ballad

a narrative song with a recurrent refrain

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a narrative poem of popular origin

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References in classic literature ?
not only without the slightest appearance of irony, or even any particular accentuation, but with so even and unbroken an appearance of seriousness that assuredly anyone might have supposed that these initials were the original ones written in the ballad.
The simple rhymes, the incremental repetitions, the obligatory epithets, the magical numbers, the nuncupative testaments, the commonplace phrases, the reliance on dialogue, the dramatic nature of the narrative: these make the ballad easier to remember, easier to memorize" (14).
1) Newman, in his response piece, Homeric Translation in Theory and Practice (1861), argued that the ballad meter "is essentially a noble metre, a popular metre, a metre of great capacity," and condemned Arnold's derision of "ballad-manner" by arguing that, if hymns could be written in the "Common Metre" that is "the prevalent balladmetre," then it is inaccurate of Arnold to assume that "whatever is in this metre must be [all] oil the same level.
Chesterton's The Ballad of the White Horse began to hit the stalls in England.
By mapping the landscape of popular balladry in the 1790s, taking into account both radical and conservative valuations, I will show how the ballad form had become suffused with anxieties about class, literacy, piety and the interaction of orality and print.
She approaches the ballad repertoire as an entry point into an alternative history, one that--if understood in conjunction with historical context--offers contemporary readers and listeners insight into the complicated and often harrowing experiences of America's first immigrants.
A central question of the book is how such women were represented in the ballad trade as "musical--and acoustic--disorder," illustrating the "sound of witchcraft and a society turned upside down" (5).
The Flax Flower is a work of fiction that retells the story of the ballad of 'Andrew Lammie' ('Mill o Tifty's Annie') (Child 233).
From a sixteenth-century perspective, the narratives function to romanticize and moralize the brutal history of Yorkshire and to use those historical events to end a contemporary feud between the Saville family, presumably allied with the Hanson family, and Sir Richard Tempest, who seemed to terrorize the district in a way similar to John Eland in the ballad (69).
The Ballad of Feather Fingal is the story of a psychic youth from Glasgow who gets caught up in the horrors of the psychiatric system.
com)-- The Ballad of Snake Oil Sam continues its journey to cinema screens at Madrid International Film Festival and then to the Fifth Annual, New Hope Film Festival, in the heart of Pennsylvania's Riverside Art Colony, New Hope.
This volume serves as a companion to the online English Broadside Ballad Archive (EBBA) and is a guide to the ballad collection of diarist Samuel Pepys (1633-1703) (the Pepys Ballad Archive (PBA) includes more than 1,800 broadside ballads).
Literary adaptations (or appropriations) of the ballad since romanticism can be understood as a unified tradition that keeps printed poetry linked to song, simulating orality by means other than performance.
This is the general context for the specific moment in modern balladry that is the occasion for this essay--a moment in which the ballad captured the attention of archivist, poet, and teacher alike in their attempts to sound folk voice and put it to use.