brain

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Synonyms for brain

Synonyms for brain

the seat of the faculty of intelligence and reason

the faculty of thinking, reasoning, and acquiring and applying knowledge

a person of great mental ability

Synonyms for brain

someone who has exceptional intellectual ability and originality

the brain of certain animals used as meat

hit on the head

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kill by smashing someone's skull

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References in periodicals archive ?
The brains of males with autism contain unusually few neurons in the amygdala, an inner-brain structure involved in emotion and memory, a new study finds.
Try taking your adult audiences on field trips where they can experience real world learning since a great deal of information stored in the brain comes from concrete experiences (Westwater & Wolfe 2000).
Both the brain and heart are highly vulnerable because of their high oxygen consumption, but the brain is especially sensitive for two reasons: first, neural cell membrane lipids are high in oxidizable polyunsaturated fatty acids (Gupta 2004); second, the developing brain has an increased metabolic demand associated with its perinatal growth spurt, during which it has lower reserves of protective enzymes and antioxidants (James et al.
If the brain and body respond in the same way that they do to many other drugs of abuse, this will show that toluene may cause addictive behavior in a similar way.
Volkow show that long-term methamphetamine abusers have lower-than-normal numbers of dopamine receptors and dopamine transporters in the brain.
Searle's discussion ranges across such topics as the limitations of computers, the nature of the unconscious, and free will as a possible feature of the brain.
Results from their functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, or fMRI, studies showed that those with very strong associations to a brand had significantly higher activation in regions of the brain involved in generating emotion.
TBI involves a postconcussional syndrome that includes: (1) a period of unconsciousness lasting for more than 5 minutes after the brain trauma, (2) a period of posttraumatic amnesia lasting for more than 12 hours, and (3) a new onset of seizures that occurs within the first 6 months after the injury (American Psychiatric Association, 1994).
Ninety percent of what scientists know about the brain has been discovered in the past decade, and the technology continues to change.
The brain is the only source of the regulated secretion of vasopressin.
It is even likely that this disappointment in a once-promising biological brain-examining tool caused psychiatry to turn away for a time from biological investigations of the brain to more psychological or sociocultural theories of mental illness and to base treatments primarily on these theories.
Using a brain-imaging machine called SPECT, researcher Andrew Newberg of the University of Pennsylvania has found that during Buddhist meditation and other forms of religious contemplation, a sector of the brain becomes calmed, a phenomenon that translates the sensory experiences of contemplation into a feeling of merging with God or the universe, Newsweek reports.
Modern research has provided evidence from both animals and humans that axons, the extending structures of brain cells or neurons which allow communication between cells to occur, are diffusely injured throughout the brain in mild head injury (Dixon et al.
A brain scan revealed diffuse swelling of the brain and a small subdural hematoma.
These range from the acute response of the brain to trauma to the long-term consequences of frontal or temporal lobe damage in a child or adult.