particle

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Synonyms for particle

Synonyms for particle

Synonyms for particle

(nontechnical usage) a tiny piece of anything

a function word that can be used in English to form phrasal verbs

References in periodicals archive ?
It is important to underline that this idea, according to which the total force acting on subatomic particles can be seen as the effect of the entropic energy shifting between different QS, appears consistent also on the ground of the results of space-time reticular dynamics mentioned in chapter 2.
You are giving a school report on subatomic particles, and your classmates have never heard of muons.
Well, that's what subatomic particles do, right there in the lab.
It may also lead to new findings involving the largely mysterious world of subatomic particles, including more information about neutrinos and the rare occurrence of mass production of particles.
This, in turn, could help scientists demarcate the boundary - if there is one - between the quantum world of subatomic particles and the classical (macroscopic) world you and I inhabit.
Subatomic particles of matter are what quantum physicists study and analyze.
Like atoms, subatomic particles can link up to form "molecules." A long-studied subatomic particle called Lambda (1405) is actually a molecule of two tightly knit particles, researchers report in the April 3 Physical Review Letters.
While Americans spent part of Wednesday watching small explosions of color in the sky, an elite group of scientists spent the day announcing their conclusions from months of studying collisions of subatomic particles on colorful computer screens.
TOKYO, June 28 Kyodo An international team of scientists have detected the passage of a beam of subatomic particles called neutrinos fired from an accelerator in Ibaraki Prefecture, eastern Japan, to a detector 250 kilometers away in Gifu Prefecture, central Japan, the team said Monday.
From the equations he derived, it seemed to him that electrons and protons (the only two subatomic particles then known) had to exist in two energy states, one positive and one negative.
This poses a dilemma for theorists, because the weakly interacting subatomic particles presumed to make up most of the dark matter should spread more uniformly throughout a cluster (S&T: March 1992, page 248).
When two subatomic particles are in a state of entanglement, they can be separated by billions of light-years, and yet be instantly affected by changes to the quantum state of the other.
Certain neutrons, or subatomic particles, with low energy signal the presence of hydrogen, which along with oxygen combines to make water ([H.sub.2]O).
For twenty years, it had been assumed that the atomic nucleus was made up of protons and electrons, since these were the only two subatomic particles known.
The Higgs boson was first proposed as a theoretical particle in the 1960s as an answer to the question of why other subatomic particles have mass, and why electromagnetic force has a much longer range than the weak nuclear force, which is responsible for radioactive decay.