social contract

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  • noun

Words related to social contract

an implicit agreement among people that results in the organization of society

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References in periodicals archive ?
It defines the political role of regional capitalists during and after the Arab uprisings, prospects for the emergence of a more independent bourgeoisie, economic reform and new social contracts.
Citizens demanding social contracts take p(r) as given, as they have no market power.
The Social Contract in America: From the Revolution to the Present Age.
Social contracts can range from political theory about the representative behavior of the individual that would be generalized to all, to the more immediate assumptions of life.
These are stockholder theory, stakeholder theory, and social contract theory.
WITH BIG BUSINESS CAST AS A VILLAIN AS IT DOWNSIZES THE WORK FORCE AND TRIES TO BECOME MORE EFFICIENT, CEOS MAKE THE CASE FOR A NEW SOCIAL CONTRACT BETWEEN EMPLOYERS AND WORKERS - AND THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COSTS OF FAILING TO DO SO.
Cancelbunny and Lazarus battle it out on the frontier of cyberspace - and suggest the limits of social contracts.
As Sobel points out regarding the League of Nations formation, social contracts are important in establishing a set of principles and laws intended to promote orderly conduct among nations.
Logical responses on Wason tests involving social contracts vary with one's perspective on cheating, Gigerenzer and Hug report in the May 1992 COGNITION.
Moreover, Social Contracts elsewhere, in exchange for wage restraint, offered unions investment planning, price and dividend controls, and wealth and other redistributive taxation.
After examining existing theories of justice, transnational ethics, and cosmopolitanism, the author proposes two global social contracts, one for ethical relations between states and one governing the global economy.
Equipped with these conceptual lenses, Binmore has revisited foundational issues concerning the nature of social contracts, and such constructs as the original position, and the categorical imperative.
here is to explore the phenomenon of terrorism as a product of violated or illegitimate social contracts.