soap

(redirected from Soap and water)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • noun
  • verb

Synonyms for soap

money offered as a bribe

Related Words

rub soap all over, usually with the purpose of cleaning

Synonyms

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
In Africa, proportions of households with soap and water ranged from 0.
The children using the hand sanitizer had 40% fewer absences than the children who just used soap and water.
Alternatively, wash hands with an antimicrobial soap and water in all clinical situations.
Soap and water kill most microbes in about 15 seconds, but that's longer than we think.
Triclosan is no better at preventing infections than plain soap and water, the panel concluded after reviewing the five scientific studies that tested antibacterial soap against regular soap.
The CDC guidelines state, "Perform hand hygiene with either a non-antimicrobial soap or antimicrobial soap and water when hands are visibly dirty or contaminated with blood or other potentially infectious material.
Scrub dirt and grime off your tent with a soft bristle brush and a mixture of mild soap and water.
The study found that 10 seconds of scrubbing, soap and water gets rid of the common cold virus, hepatitis A, and a host of other germs.
Soap and water worked better because the infectious agents were simply removed from the skin and flushed down the drain.
SOAP and water is better than modern cleansers for ridding hands of viruses, says a study.
The Mann-Whitney U-Test showed that alcohol-gel significantly reduced bacterial counts compared to soap and water (p< .
Old-fashioned hand washing with soap and water significantly reduces the amount of contamination on volunteers' hands from a form of bacteria comparable to anthrax bacteria, according to a study that appeared in the March 12, 2003, issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association.
Always wash your hands with soap and water after handling the dishes
Studies have found they work as well as, if not better than, soap and water, with the bonus of convenience, since they don't need water.