Sabin vaccine


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Related to Sabin vaccine: DPT vaccine, Salk vaccine
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  • noun

Synonyms for Sabin vaccine

an oral vaccine (containing live but weakened poliovirus) that is given to provide immunity to poliomyelitis

References in periodicals archive ?
Thomas Breuer, Chief Medical Officer of GSK Vaccines, said: 'These agreements with the Sabin Vaccine Institute are an important next step in the fight against Ebola and Marburg viruses.
The idea behind them is that by combining forces, governments and philanthropies can assure pharmaceutical companies of a market for a medicine or vaccine, thus giving companies the incentive to develop it. The Sabin Vaccine Institute, for instance, whose work includes developing vaccines for (http://www.ibtimes.com/how-three-scientists-marketed-neglected-tropical-diseases-raised-more-1-billion-1921008) neglected tropical diseases , counts the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Baylor College of Medicine and Brazilian research institute FundaAaAaAeAoAa Oswaldo Cruz among its partners.
The Sabin Vaccine Institute is a non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization of scientists, researchers, and advocates dedicated to reducing needless human suffering caused by vaccine preventable and neglected tropical diseases.
In 2009, the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases--an initiative of the Sabin Vaccine Institute, the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and other partners came together to establish a regional initiative for the prevention, control, and elimination of neglected tropical diseases.
The latest to join the fray is Dengue Vaccine Initiative jointly launched by the World Health Organization, Johns Hopkins University, International Vaccine Institute and Sabin Vaccine Institute.
1962: Salk vaccine replaced by the Sabin vaccine for most purposes because it is easier to administer and less expensive.
Few people are more qualified to write such a book than Hotez, president of the Sabin Vaccine Institute and a pioneer in hookworm molecular genetics, physiology, immunology, and pathogenesis.
President of the Sabin Vaccine Institute, Hotez (microbiology, immunology, and tropical medicine; George Washington U.) continues his effort to raise public awareness about parasitical infections that do not make the headlines, and to advocate for the mostly very poor people living in the remote and rural regions where they are endemic.
C[pounds sterling]You recognize the gravity now as she has become a difficult and impossible teen-ager.C[yen]HotezCOs feelings as a parent of an autistic child might seem unremarkable, except that he also happens to be one of the countryCOs more prominent vaccine researchers.He is president of the Sabin Vaccine Institute, the chair of George Washington UniversityCOs department of microbiology, immunology and tropical medicine, and a consultant to the Gates Foundation, which is helping to develop vaccines to fight neglected diseases.The notion that a vaccine expert would deliberately cover up the cause of a growing public health problem cuts Peter Hotez to the quick.
In its favor, the killed-virus Salk vaccine cannot cause polio, while the live-virus Sabin vaccine can, though it only very rarely does (usually in people with compromised immune systems).
I was especially interested in comparing the original Salk vaccine to the Sabin vaccine developed several years later.
In 1957 the Sabin vaccine came into widespread use in the Soviet Union and eastern Europe.
Should children be allowed to have the Sabin vaccine, since it involves artificial denaturing of the polio virus and furthermore disrupst the life cycle and natural propagation of a spontaneously arising form of RNA?
The attenuated vaccine (OPV), also named Sabin vaccine after its originator, contains live virus that has been treated so it can't cause polio.
They collaborated with epidemiologists and infectious disease specialists from the University's department of paediatrics to bring the matter to the attention of local government, the World Health Organization, the US National Institutes of Health, the Sabin Vaccine Institute and the UK-based Wellcome Sanger Institute.