Richard Feynman

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Synonyms for Richard Feynman

United States physicist who contributed to the theory of the interaction of photons and electrons (1918-1988)

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143) This is one of many gems in Perfectly Reasonable Deviations from the Beaten Track: The Letters of Richard P. Feynman. The book is full of such letters, and they range, like Feynman's own interests, across myriad subjects.
(4.) Richard P. Feynman. Nobel lecture: the development of the space-time view of quantum electrodynamics.
(4.) Richard P. Feynman, "Surely you're joking, Mr.
(6.) Richard P. Feynman, "What do you care what other people think?" Further Adventures of a Curious Character (New York: W.
(17.) Richard P. Feynman, Perfectly Reasonable Deviations from the Beaten Track (New York: Basic Books), p.
The renowned physicist and Nobel prize winner Richard P. Feynman, for instance, once got it into his head to figure out why uncooked spaghetti doesn't snap neatly in two when you bend it far enough to break.
postage stamp honoring a legendary physicist, the late Richard P. Feynman.
Those trying to decipher the symbols didn't know that she was the daughter of the quantum physicist Richard P. Feynman, who had created the figures.
Richard P. Feynman was a Nobel prize-winning physicist who not only advanced quantum electrodynamics but was also famous for his outgoing personality and keen ability to impart complicated ideas to a lay audience.
Testing the boundaries of the second law has been a sport for many physics luminaries including the late Richard P. Feynman. Each claim of a phenomenon that violates that law has stirred animated debate, and none has held up to scrutiny.
Richard P. Feynman, Julian Schwinger, and Sin-Itiro Tomonaga figured out a way to make the infinite values cancel out by means of a process called renormalization.
Brattain on the invention of the transistor (1948), and Richard P. Feynman on a spacetime approach to quantum electrodynamics (1949).
The current outbreak can be traced back to 1981, when the late Richard P. Feynman noted that physicists always seem to run into computational problems when they try to simulate a system in which quantum mechanics plays a dominant role.
The notion of quantum computation goes back to 1982, when the late Richard P. Feynman noted that physicists always seem to run into computational difficulties whenever they try to simulate a quantum mechanical system.