RICO Act


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Related to RICO Act: Rico law
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Synonyms for RICO Act

law intended to eradicate organized crime by establishing strong sanctions and forfeiture provisions

References in periodicals archive ?
applied the RICO Act by arguing that the botnet was "de facto an
The inclusion of "any" within the definition clearly suggests a legislative intent to direct the thrust of the RICO Act against an individual "associating with himself." Had the legislature not intended to reach individuals such as Bowen, it could easily have narrowed the sweep of Section 943.461(3), by supplanting "any" with "another." (51)
As a practical matter, the material support statute also shares the RICO Act's aggregation flaw.
of Justice under the RICO act, which required his arrest.
She looked to the 1970 Racketeer Influenced and Corruptions Act (RICO Act), a federal law providing extensive criminal penalties and civil forfeiture for acts performed as part of an ongoing criminal organization.
IN A CASE of mistaken identity, the Sk8mafia is indicted under the Rico Act
The RICO Act was originally designed to prevent organized crime.
The suit makes its allegations under the federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, or RICO Act, which increases the penalties for acts committed as part of an ongoing criminal enterprise.
The Wus were found liable on more than a dozen counts, including theft of trade secrets, fraud, violations of the Florida RICO Act and negligent destruction of evidence.
However, given that the trustees managed to dispose of the bulk of the company's assets within months of the bankruptcy, Van Apeldoorn would not elaborate on why they decided to sue under the RICO Act so long after the event.
The highly derivative nature of RICO offenses is further exposed by examination of section 1962(d)--conspiracy to violate the other sections of the RICO Act. For example, with respect to subsection (c), violation of subsection (d) means conspiracy to conduct or participate, through at least two "acts or threats" involving any of the crimes listed in the statute, in any group of individuals associated in fact affecting interstate commerce.
Three individuals associated with L&L Collision, John Lentz, Michael Lentz, and Andrea Lentz, were all found liable for violating the RICO act, common law fraud, and civil conspiracy, with the latter two individuals also being found liable for breach of contract.
The second tells how the prosecutors hunted them down and shows that the key to the investigation's success wasn't the highly publicized RICO Act, but the ability of the prosecutors first to terrify and then to immunize smaller fry, who then ratted on their superiors.