Prunus virginiana


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Synonyms for Prunus virginiana

a common wild cherry of eastern North America having small bitter black berries favored by birds

References in periodicals archive ?
Plant regeneration of chokecherry (Prunus virginiana L.) from in vitro leaf tissues.
The prevailing shrubs and small trees along the shore were: osier rouge and alders (before mentioned); sallows, or small willows, of two or three kinds, as Salis humilis, rostrata, and discolor?, Sambucus Canadensis (black elder), rose, Viburnum opulus and nudum (cranberry-tree and withe-rod), Pyrus Americana (American mountain-ash), Corylus rostrata (beaked hazel-nut), Diervilla trifida (bush-honeysuckle), Prunus Virginiana (choke-cherry), Myrica gate (sweet-gale), Nemopanthes Canadensis (mountain holly), Cephalanthus occidentalis (button-bush), Ribes prostratum, in some places (fetid currant).
The prolific chokecherry (Prunus virginiana) is another bear favorite, although it has such a widespread range that there are plenty of places where people can harvest without keeping an eye out for furry foragers.
Shrubs were Aronia prunnifolia (chokeberry), Gaylussacia baccata (black huckleberry), Hamamelis virginiana (witch hazel), Malus coronaria (American crab), Prunus virginiana (choke cherry), Rosa carolina (pasture rose), Vacciniam angustifolium (early low blueberry), and V.
Shrubs included sandbar willow (Salix exigua) and American hazel (Corylus americana), but featured a number of species with edible berries and fleshy fruits such as chokecherry (Prunus virginiana), wild rose (Rosa spp.), raspberry (Rubus idaeus) and Saskatoon (Amelanchier alnifolia).
Domatia of five of these species are axillary tufts (Hardin, 1992) of trichomes arising from either the leaf veins or lamina in the juncture of primary veins alone (e.g., Prunus virginiana), or sometimes also in secondary axils (e.g., Quercus velutina) and even tertiary vein axils (e.g., Vitis riparia).