Prague

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Synonyms for Prague

the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic in the western part of the country

References in periodicals archive ?
May 9 Soviet troops capture Prague, Czechoslovakia. Two days later, General Ferdinand Schorner surrenders the last functioning German army group in Europe.
She was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia, daughter of the late Fred and Ela Feldman.
After joining MI6 in 1966, Dearlove served in Nairobi, Kenya; Prague, Czechoslovakia; Paris; Geneva, Switzerland; and Washington.
She was born Gertrud Hutter, in Prague, Czechoslovakia, and attended the Prague Musikhochschule, majoring in piano and minoring in dance.
Born Erna Grabler in Prague, Czechoslovakia, she began studying ballet at age 5 and turned down a Bolshoi Ballet scholarship at 12 to go to the West with dancing partner John von Kralik, aka Johnson.
Born in Prague, Czechoslovakia, Zach (his full name, by the way, is pronounced "yon zock') was already a budding art star by the time he came as a student to New York in 1938 to work on the Czech pavilion at the New York World's Fair.
In 1963, Andersen attended the International Bee Congress, in Prague, Czechoslovakia. There, he met Miss Walentyna Jaskulsak, a native of Poland, who was on vacation.
"The present reprint includes a part of Tlass's dissertation and a translation of a book named 'The Young Martyr of Prague' that tells the story of the murder of the youth Simon Abeles in 1694 in Prague, Czechoslovakia...Recently, Tlass responded to accusations that he is anti-Semitic, saying: 'Don't they know what anti-Semitism means?
[The following are excerpt of the speech given to the Prague, Czechoslovakia Meeting held in November 2002.]
Philipp's dad bought a train ticket to Prague, Czechoslovakia, for the night of November 9, 1989.
Headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts, the company was founded in Prague, Czechoslovakia by the people behind NetBeans, a developer of a Java-based integrated development environment (IDE) for Linux, which was bought by Sun Microsystems in late 1999.
This amazing little volume is an unabridged republication of a work originally published by the Oriental Institute, Prague, Czechoslovakia, in 1935.