polar

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Related to Polars: Polaris
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  • adj

Synonyms for polar

Synonyms for polar

Synonyms for polar

having a pair of equal and opposite charges

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characterized by opposite extremes

of or existing at or near a geographical pole or within the Arctic or Antarctic Circles

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extremely cold

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being of crucial importance

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References in classic literature ?
The father of Keesh had been a very brave man, but he had met his death in a time of famine, when he sought to save the lives of his people by taking the life of a great polar bear.
The killing of a polar bear is very dangerous, but thrice dangerous is it, and three times thrice, to kill a mother bear with her cubs.
And this is the story of Keesh, who lived long ago on the rim of the polar sea.
Nothing could be more weird than the appearance of these seemingly basaltic summits; they stood out in fantastic profile against the sombre sky, and the beholder might have fancied them to be the legendary ruins of some vast city of the middle ages, such as the icebergs of the polar seas sometimes mimic them in nights of gloom.
Mirth never reigned there; there was never even a little bear-ball, with the storm for music, while the polar bears went on their hindlegs and showed off their steps.
As on the land, so in the waters of the sea, a slow southern migration of a marine fauna, which during the Pliocene or even a somewhat earlier period, was nearly uniform along the continuous shores of the Polar Circle, will account, on the theory of modification, for many closely allied forms now living in areas completely sundered.
In illustrating what, as I believe, actually took place during the Glacial period, I assumed that at its commencement the arctic productions were as uniform round the polar regions as they are at the present day.
During the slowly decreasing warmth of the Pliocene period, as soon as the species in common, which inhabited the New and Old Worlds, migrated south of the Polar Circle, they must have been completely cut off from each other.
The enterprise has failed--the Arctic expedition is lost and ice-locked in the Polar wastes.
Indoors, and out-of-doors, the awful silence of the Polar desert reigns, for the moment, undisturbed.