Phrygian


Also found in: Dictionary, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Words related to Phrygian

a native or inhabitant of Phrygia

a Thraco-Phrygian language spoken by the ancient inhabitants of Phrygia and now extinct--preserved only in a few inscriptions

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
Other Spanish characteristics are the use of the Phrygian mode in the melody, the alternation of the major chords E and F in the piano, and traces of an Andalucian cadence in mm.
Damon, fifth century BCE musicologist and associate of Pericles, wrote of the correspondence of different musical modes and rhythms to different moral qualities; Plato incorporated his ideas into his theories, but approved of only the Dorian and Phrygian modes for the edification of the public (West, "Music in antiquity" 57-59).
There are a plethora of additional named scales, but a few worth adding to this list are the Lydian Dominant, Phrygian Dominant, and the Super Locrian.
Continue reading "How Time's Arrow and the Phrygian Half-Step Make Jewish Music Holy" at...
The Phrygian cap became a symbol of liberty during which revolution?
Examples include the Phrygian cap of the French Revolution, the Iwo Jima flag photograph of World War If, the hammer and sickle of the Soviet Union, and, most recently, the iconic multi-tone "Hope" poster of Barack Obama.
Originally having the literal meaning of 'joining together', in the sixth century harmonia [1] began to describe musical notes united in a system of concord [Pythagorean numbers theory], [2] the act of tuning a musical instrument, [3] and the various musical modes such as the Dorian, Phrygian, and Lydian modes" (11).
Originally having the literal meaning of 'joining together,' in the sixth century harmonia [1] began to describe musical notes united in a system of concord [Pythagorean numbers theory], [2] the act of tuning a musical instrument, [3] and the various musical modes such as the Dorian, Phrygian, and Lydian modes" (11).
According to historic sources, the site was located in the ancient Phrygian city of Hierapolis, now called Pamukkale, and the opening was described as filled with lethal mephitic vapors.
Middle Bronze Age, Greek-6th century BC, Halaf, Hittite, Iron Age, Neo-Assyrian, Neo-Hittite, Old Assyrian, Old Hittite, Phrygian,
Among the topics are the Old Irish paradigm of clause types, long-vowel preterites in Indo-European, the inflection of the Hittite verb class of mema/i-, interpretation of the Tocharian subjunctive class III, the Phrygian middle, and cuneiform Luvian verbs in *-ye/o-.
The inhabitants of Antioch at this time were a mixture of Roman veterans and their families, descendents of the earlier Hellenistic settlers, and people of Phrygian and Pisidian background.
The polished white-metal of the tinned bronze face (the eyes are open-work) would have shone out in dramatic contrast to the original golden bronze of the corkscrew curls and Phrygian cap, and colourful streamers may well have been affixed to the rings along the back ridge and to the apparently unique solid-cast griffin crest at the top of the cap.
The appliques take the form of elaborate Phrygian helmets, which originated in classical Greece and were widely used in the Hellenic world and well into the Roman Empire.