affirmation

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Synonyms for affirmation

Synonyms for affirmation

an act of confirming officially

Synonyms for affirmation

a statement asserting the existence or the truth of something

the act of affirming or asserting or stating something

(religion) a solemn declaration that serves the same purpose as an oath (if an oath is objectionable to the person on religious or ethical grounds)

a judgment by a higher court that the judgment of a lower court was correct and should stand

References in periodicals archive ?
Section 13 says that the President-elect shall, during the swearing-inceremony, take and subscribe the oath or affirmation of allegiance and the oath or affirmation for the execution of the functions of office.
Thereafter, the Speaker will have the Oath or Affirmation administered to him by the Secretary-General of Parliament and sign the Roll of Members.
The oath or affirmation is taken in pursuance of Article 99 of the Constitution.
Additional Chief Metropolitan Magistrate Vinod Kumar Gautam charged Dinesh Yadav under sections 420 ( cheating) and 181 ( false statement on oath or affirmation to public servant) of the IPC.
Constitution, which reads: "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."
The section states that the president (no other officeholders are mentioned) is required to make the following oath or affirmation: "I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the office of president of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States."
de Villiers, in his article "Oath or Affirmation? Or Neither?", argues "[I]n practice in our courts (at least in matters under the jurisdiction of the federal Parliament) it is assumed that witnesses will take the oath in conformity with Anglican ritual unless they expressly elect either to take an oath in conformity with some other religion or to affirm." ...
The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers, both of the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or Affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States.
The Senators and Representatives [...], and the Members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers, both of the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or Affirmation, to support this Constitution[...].
Constitution reads: The fight of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.
The current oath or affirmation includes a pledge of allegiance to the Queen and her successors.
"Each of you at the outset took an oath or affirmation to return a true verdict according to the evidence.
They officially confirmed their new citizenship after saying an oath or affirmation and signing a register in front of family and friends.