Gogol

(redirected from Nikolai Gogol)
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Synonyms for Gogol

Russian writer who introduced realism to Russian literature (1809-1852)

References in periodicals archive ?
In Vancouver, playwright Morris Panych's obsession with Nikolai Gogol's pungent satire began more than 20 years ago when he transformed it into a brilliantly original, wordless theatre piece with the same tide as the short story.
Galymkair Mutanov was recently awarded the Nikolai Gogol "Triumph" International Literary Prize in Ukraine.
As you leave the city, the last remaining Lenin mural is sandwiched between Gogol Street (named after the Ukrainian-born writer Nikolai Gogol) and Kiev Street.
En la introduccion al libro, los editores ponen como ejemplo los casos de Nikolai Gogol y Vladimir Soloviev.
Voltaire, James Joyce, Oscar Wilde, Georges Bizet, Karl Marx, Victor Hugo, Samuel Beckett, Nikolai Gogol, Winston Churchill, Gabriele D'Annunzio, Marlene Dietrich, Ernest Hemingway and Salvador Dali were all eccentrics, and all were great.
"Dead Souls" by Nikolai Gogol - This book comes up several times in an episode where Rory is applying to Harvard.
THIS play was written by Nikolai Gogol almost 200 years ago and is set in Russia.
0121 345 0600 THEATRE The Government Inspector This political satire was written by Nikolai Gogol in 1836 but is as funny and relevant today.
The Government Inspector was written in 1836 by Nikolai Gogol but its tale of political corruption in Imperial Russia is as relevant and funny today.
The writers who inspired him the most for these plays were MoliAre and Nikolai Gogol. When asked about playwriting, Rizvi said, "I write when I'm inspired.
In a 1969 interview with Allene Talmey of Vogue, Vladimir Nabokov dismissed his own Nikolai Gogol, a critical biography of the nineteenth-century Russian writer as an "innocent, and rather superficial, little sketch" (Strong 156).
Doing just that with Nikolai Gogol's 1836 black comedy about Russian card sharks, Newcastle company Greyscale and the Dundee Rep have used the device to say much about men and their attitudes to money.
This is a re-telling of Nikolai Gogol's The Nose, in which a man wakes up one day and realises that his nose has simply disappeared.
A scene from Dead Souls even offers us a "Scott"-ish hint to reading Nikolai Gogol's enigmatic Russian novel.