jaundice

(redirected from Neonatal jaundice)
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Synonyms for jaundice

to cause to have a prejudiced view

Synonyms for jaundice

yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eyes caused by an accumulation of bile pigment (bilirubin) in the blood

a rough and bitter manner

distort adversely

Related Words

affect with, or as if with, jaundice

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References in periodicals archive ?
Many studies have been done to define an early marker of neonatal jaundice for the early detection of neonates at high risk of severe hyperbilirubinemia to prevent long-term poor results.
Risk factors of neonatal jaundice includes hemolysis secondary to Rhesus isoimmunisation and ABO incompatibility, sepsis, prematurity and enzyme defects (Uridyl diphosphate glucoronyl transferase enzyme deficiency).
Most studies on neonatal jaundice in Nigeria have dwelt mainly on clinical research concentrating on the medical aetiological factors [2-4,7,8] and on the management of neonatal jaundice by healthcare staff.
The frequency of neonatal jaundice among newborns in Aktobe amounted to 4.
The present study was designed to compare the mean decrease in serum bilirubin using continuous and intermittent phototherapy techniques for neonatal jaundice.
Olowe, "Infants with severe neonatal jaundice in Lagos, Nigeria: incidence, correlates and hearing screening outcomes," Tropical Medicine & International Health, vol.
G6PD is an x-linked recessive disease where the deficiency of the enzyme causes a spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from neonatal jaundice to chronic nonspherocytic anemia to infection and drug-induced hemolysis.
gt; Preterm baby admitted in NICU and requiring ventilator etc, high levels of neonatal jaundice
Among the secondary outcomes assessed in this review was an improvement in neonatal hemoglobin concentration and overall iron stores associated with delayed clamping--but this benefit came at the expense of a higher incidence of neonatal jaundice requiring phototherapy.
The baby was admitted to hospital with neonatal jaundice and later required an urgent craniotomy and evacuation of a subdural haematoma.
Management and support (NICE, 2010) Infants more likely to develop significant hyperbilirubinaemia are: * Neontates under 38 weeks gestation * Infants with a sibling who required phototherapy for neonatal jaundice * Infants whose mothers intend to breastfeed exclusively * Visible jaundice in the first 24 hours of life
present 13 chapters by pediatrics and other specialists from the US, Europe, and Nigeria, who detail the basic science and clinical information for understanding neonatal jaundice and associated brain damage and care of the jaundiced neonate.
The surgical causes of prolonged neonatal jaundice include BA, hypoplasia of bile ducts, inspissated bile ducts, choledochal cysts and spontaneous bile duct perforation.
1,2] Some of the most common causes of neonatal jaundice include physiological jaundice, breast feeding or non feeding jaundice, breast milk jaundice, prematurity leading to jaundice & various pathological causes like haemolytic disease, liver dysfunction, neonatal sepsis, deficiency of G6PD enzyme, hypothyroidism and rare conditions such as gilbert's syndrome etc.
Dermal icteric zones and serum bilirubin levels in neonatal jaundice.
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