Neoplatonism

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Words related to Neoplatonism

a system of philosophical and theological doctrines composed of elements of Platonism and Aristotelianism and oriental mysticism

References in periodicals archive ?
Not only does Lewis take us back to classical Greek philosophy with his mentions of both the neo-Platonists and Aristotle in this chapter, but he also tells us that the 12th century neo-Platonists communicated or exchanged, at least in part, in the language of God.
But I'd tentatively hazard the ghost of a speculation that his rationalism, which far exceeds that of Descartes, might have received some of its creative daring from the neo-Platonist strain transmitted in Kabbalah.
Lawrence argues persuasively that this shift from the Bible to Church ethical moralizing was prompted by the move from biblical theological metaphors and values to the Graeco-Roman philosophical values and principles championed by the Stoics, Cynics, Neo-Platonists, and other strains of pagan culture that were everywhere rampant in the Mediterranean world during the first eight centuries of Christian history.
acknowledges Augustine's initial enthusiasm over the neo-Platonists, but claims that by the time of the City of God these men "who had once meant so much to him that he could claim that they had changed his life forever, were now the stooges for a philosophical dumb-show" (123).
She shows how the libertine's spiritualism differs from that of Ficino and the Florentine neo-Platonists, another group whom Marguerite favored and whose writings were influential at the French court in the 1540s.
Stephen Halliwell's book aims at (1) undertaking the searching examination of the ancient roots of the concept of mimesis that lies in the very core of the entire history of Western Aesthetics in understanding and evaluating artworks--from the "formative approaches of Plato and Aristotle to the innovative treatment of mimesis by the Neo-Platonists of late antiquity", (2) elucidating "the complex legacy bestowed on Aesthetics from the Renaissance to the twentieth century by mimeticist ways of thinking".
Instead he discusses tangential issues such as the introduction of printing to the Hudson Bay Territory, Marshall McLuhan's theories, and design and typography in the treatises of Renaissance neo-Platonists. In contrast to Cavell's speculative pyrotechnics, George Parker's essay on the influence of British publishing in Canada during the Second World War is a carefully written study solidly based on the records of the Book Publishers' Branch of the Board of Trade of the City of Toronto.
Augustine that neo-Platonists like Plotinus, Porphyry, and Proclus had to be excluded from the City of God.
One of the best examples of the generative idea and of time-binding, it passes down the centuries in the works of the Neo-Platonists, the Cambridge Platonists, the Schelling school of German Idealists, Coleridge and Carlyle in England, to its chief American adapter, Ralph Waldo Emerson.
This first scene, highlighting the potency of poetry and music, surely owes a debt to the voluminous writings by Plato and neo-Platonists on the topic; I would hesitate, however, to follow Sabol in linking the theme of divine frenzy in the masque specifically to Pontus de Tyard's philosophical treatise Solitaire premier (1552 and 1575).
Gnostics and neo-Platonists and wild-eyed German Romantics, rock-critical response and the Fall and High Sex Goddess Kim Gordon: books and record collections stretching out toward infinity.
The concern that the soul would be construed as akin to body and be deprived of its unique status is common cause among neo-Platonists as one sees in Section 152, "Verteidigung der Seelenlehre Platons gegen Aristotles und die Materialisten." Here Atticus, Numenius of Apamea, and Cassius Longinus defend a more august conception of the soul against those who view it as epiphenomenal vis-a-vis the body.